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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Boma fortification is cost-effective at reducing predation of livestock in a high-predation zone in the Western Mara region, Kenya

Published source details

Sutton A.E., Downey M.G., Kamande E., Munyao F., Rinaldi M., Taylor A.K. & Pimm S. (2017) Boma fortification is cost-effective at reducing predation of livestock in a high-predation zone in the Western Mara region, Kenya. Conservation Evidence, 14, 32-38


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install non-electric fencing to exclude predators or herbivores and reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2013–2015 of 308 savanna households in Narok County, Kenya (Sutton et al. 2017) found that fewer livestock were lost to mammalian predators from fortified fenced areas than from traditional thorn-bush-fenced areas. Households holding their livestock in fortified fences lost fewer on average to predators (0.35 animal/month) than did households with livestock in traditional fenced areas (0.96 animals/month). The proportion of households not losing any livestock to mammalian predators over a year was higher for those using fortified fences (67%) than for those using traditional fences (15%). Mammalian predators included lions Panthera leo, leopards Panthera pardus, wild dogs Lycaon pictus, spotted hyenas Crocuta crocuta, honey badgers Mellivora capensis, cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus and baboons Papio sp. The study was based on 375 interviews, carried out from April 2013 to July 2015, with 308 Maasai households that housed livestock in fenced areas (bomas). Including some that were upgraded during the study, 179 households used fences fortified with posts, chain link wire and galvanized wire and 164 households used traditional fences made of thorny plants and branches during some or all of the period.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)