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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Restoring Native Perennial Grasses by Changing Grazing Practices in Central Coastal California

Published source details

Henneman C., Seavy N.E. & Gardali T. (2014) Restoring Native Perennial Grasses by Changing Grazing Practices in Central Coastal California. Ecological Restoration, 32, 352-354


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Use rotational grazing Mediterranean Farmland

A before-and-after study in 2011–2013 in grasslands in central California, USA, found that native grasses increased in cattle pasture after the adoption of rotational grazing. Plants: More survey units had native grasses, two years after rotational grazing was adopted, compared to before (80% vs 8%). Average percentage cover increased to 3%, two years after rotational grazing was introduced, compared to 0% before (0–20% vs 0–10%). Methods: In 2011, cattle density in 74 plots (1–10 ha) was increased to 110–170 t/ha, with fields grazed for 1–7 days and rested for 70–120 days (depending on the time of year and pasture quality). Previously, larger fields were grazed for longer periods, with little rest between grazing periods. Vegetation cover was estimated each July, using transects of variable lengths.