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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Habitat Management for the Endangered Stephens' Kangaroo Rat: The Effect of Mowing and Grazing

Published source details

Kelt D.A., Konno E.S. & Wilson J.A. (2005) Habitat Management for the Endangered Stephens' Kangaroo Rat: The Effect of Mowing and Grazing. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 69, 424-429


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Use grazers to manage vegetation Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled before-and-after study in 1996–2000 in grasslands in southern California, USA, found that Stephen’s kangaroo rat Dipodomys stephensi increased in numbers on sheep-grazed plots, but not on ungrazed plots. Monthly survival was lower on grazed plots. Mammals: Similar numbers of kangaroo rats were found in grazed and ungrazed plots after two grazing sessions (13–38 individuals/ha), but fewer were found after one grazing session and in six of eight surveys before grazing (1–19 vs 21–39). Similar numbers were found in plots that were mown and then grazed, compared to ungrazed plots, after grazing (18–38), but fewer were found before grazing, in 14 of 15 surveys (3–14 vs 21–38). Monthly survival was lower on grazed plots, compared to ungrazed plots (data not provided). Methods: Eight 80 x 80 m plots were established in December 1996. Three were grazed in June 1998 (1,500 sheep for four hours) and 1999 (200 sheep for three days), three were mown in 1998 and grazed in 1999, and two were neither mown nor grazed. Kangaroo rats were trapped in 24 periods of three nights each.