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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of Cattle Management on Oak Regeneration in Northern Californian Mediterranean Oak Woodlands

Published source details

López-Sánchez A., Schroeder J., Roig S., Sobral M. & Dirzo R. (2014) Effects of Cattle Management on Oak Regeneration in Northern Californian Mediterranean Oak Woodlands. PLOS ONE, 9, e105472


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated site comparison in 2013 in oak woodlands in northern California, USA, found higher densities of young coast live oaks Quercus agrifolia in areas that were not grazed by cattle, compared to grazed areas. Young oaks were also larger in ungrazed, compared to grazed, areas, but there were no differences in density or size of adult trees. Plants: There were higher densities of oak seedlings and saplings in areas without cattle, compared to grazed areas (22 vs 11 trees/200 m2), but there were no differences in the density of adult trees (2 trees/200 m2). Trees were larger in ungrazed areas, compared to grazed areas (data reported as model results). Trees were less likely to have grazing damage in ungrazed areas, compared to areas with cattle, and damage was less likely to be serious (0% vs 6% of trees with at least 70% of edible biomass damaged). Methods: Areas of open oak woodland in eight ranches (four no-longer grazed, three with year-round grazing, and one with grazing from November–May) were surveyed in 2013 for oak trees of all ages using belt transects.