Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Cattle grazing has varying impacts on stream-channel erosion in oak woodlands

Published source details

George M.R., Larsen R.E., McDougald N.K., Tate K.W., Gerlach J.J.D. & Fulgham K.O. (2004) Cattle grazing has varying impacts on stream-channel erosion in oak woodlands. California Agriculture, 58, 138-143


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Use seasonal grazing Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995–1998 in forested pastures in central California, USA, found no difference in plant cover on stream banks or in grassy areas in pastures grazed by cattle in the dry season, compared to the wet season. Plants: There was no difference in plant cover on stream banks or in the surrounding grassy areas between pastures grazed in the dry season, compared to the wet season (31–84%). Methods: Two pastures in each of three streams were assigned to either dry- or wet-season grazing (July–October and October/November–May, respectively). Half of each were grazed at moderate intensity, and half at high intensity (reducing stubble to 2–3 and <2 inches, respectively). Plant cover was measured in June, on 10 transects running across the streams.

 

Other biodiversity: Use fewer grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995–1998 in forested pastures in central California, USA, found no difference in plant cover on stream banks and surrounding grass between pastures moderately and intensively grazed by cattle. Plants: There was no difference in plant cover on stream banks and the surrounding grass between moderately and intensively grazed (31–84% cover). Methods: Two pastures in each of three streams were assigned to either moderate or intensive grazing (reducing stubble to 2–3 and less than 2 inches, respectively). Half of each were grazed in the dry season, and half in the wet season (July–October and October/November–May, respectively). Plant cover was measured in June on 10 transects running across the streams.

 

Other biodiversity: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995–1998 in forested pastures in central California, USA, found no difference in plant cover on stream banks and the surrounding grass between ungrazed pastures and most cattle grazing regimes. Plants: There was no difference in plant cover on stream banks and the surrounding grass between ungrazed and grazed pastures, for three of four grazing regimes (6–94% cover). There was higher plant cover in ungrazed plot, compared to grazed plots, for high intensity, dry-season grazing (72–94% vs 31–51%). Methods: One pasture in each of three streams was ungrazed and the other four were grazed moderately or intensively (reducing stubble to 2–3 and less than 2 inches, respectively) and in the dry season or the wet season (July–October and October/November–May, respectively). Plant cover was measured in June on 10 transects across the streams.