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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: FIRE AND GRAZING IMPACTS ON PLANT DIVERSITY AND ALIEN PLANT INVASIONS IN THE SOUTHERN SIERRA NEVADA

Published source details

Keeley J.E., Lubin D. & Fotheringham C.J. (2003) FIRE AND GRAZING IMPACTS ON PLANT DIVERSITY AND ALIEN PLANT INVASIONS IN THE SOUTHERN SIERRA NEVADA. Ecological Applications, 13, 1355-1374


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized site comparison in 1999 in blue oak savanna in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, found lower coverage of alien plants in ungrazed sites, compared to cattle-grazed sites. Plants: Similar numbers of alien plant species, but lower coverage of alien plants, were found in ungrazed sites, compared to cattle-grazed sites (40% vs 55% alien cover; 20 vs 26 alien species). Grazed and ungrazed sites had fewer native plants than alien plants, and fewer native plants were found where there were fewer alien plants, at one of three scales (1 m2: data reported as test statistics). Fewer perennial herbs were found on ungrazed sites, compared to cattle-grazed sites (data reported as test statistics). Methods: Grazers were excluded from five sites in Sequoia National Park at least 100 years before the study began, but they were not historically excluded from five sites on the nearby Bureau of Land Management land. Plants were sampled in 0.1 ha sites, at three scales (1 m2, 100 m2, and 1,000 m3).