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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of fertilization and grazing exclusion in mitigating lost meadow production in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA

Published source details

Kie J.G. & Myler S.A. (1987) Use of fertilization and grazing exclusion in mitigating lost meadow production in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA. Environmental Management, 11, 641-648


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1982–1984 in alpine meadows in central California, USA, found higher biomass of some plant groups in plots from which cattle were excluded, compared to grazed plots. Plants: The peak biomass of non-grass plants was higher in plots with cattle excluded, compared to grazed plots, in one of two meadows, one year after fertilizer was added (252 vs 99–138 g/m2). However, there were no differences in the other meadow, in the other two years, or when plots were not fertilized (30–249 g/m2). There was no difference in the biomass of grass between ungrazed and grazed plots for either meadow, in any year (170–480 g/m2). There were no differences between ungrazed and grazed plots in the cover of sedges and rushes (7–71% cover) or non-grass plants (20–71% cover). Methods: Eighteen plots were established in two grazed meadows in 1982, with cattle excluded from half. The vegetation in plots was sampled at 30 points in July and August 1982–1984. Half of the plots were also fertilized in 1982.