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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Habitat restoration promotes pollinator persistence and colonization in intensively managed agriculture

Published source details

M'Gonigle L.K., Ponisio L.C., Cutler K. & Kremen C. (2015) Habitat restoration promotes pollinator persistence and colonization in intensively managed agriculture. Ecological Applications, 25, 1557-1565


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Pollination: Plant hedgerows Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated site comparison in April–August of 2006–2013 in field borders in the Central Valley, California, USA (same study as (3)), found more species of bees and syrphid flies in planted hedgerows than in unplanted field borders, but only after several years of hedgerow growth. Pollinator numbers and Implementation options: More species of bees and syrphid flies were estimated to be present in planted hedgerows than in unplanted field borders, 4–6 years after planting (2013: 65 vs 45 species; 2012: 60 vs 40; 2011: 55 vs 40), but not 0–3 years after planting (2010: 50 vs 40 species; 2009–2008: 45 vs 40; 2007: 35 vs 35). Methods: Field borders (350 x 3–6 m) were planted with native shrubs and trees in 2007–2008 in five fields, and unplanted borders in ten fields were used as controls. Fields borders had an irrigation ditch or slough. Fields were approximately 80 acres of row crops, vineyards, or orchards. Hedgerows were watered and weeded for three years. At least three times per year, insects were collected from flowers on one-hour transects at each site.