Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: On-farm habitat restoration counters biotic homogenization in intensively managed agriculture

Published source details

Ponisio L.C., M'Gonigle L.K. & Kremen C. (2015) On-farm habitat restoration counters biotic homogenization in intensively managed agriculture. Global Change Biology, 22, 704-715


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Pollination: Plant hedgerows Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated site comparison in 2007–2013 in farmland in the Central Valley, California, USA, found greater bee diversity in mature hedgerows compared to weedy field edges or immature (“maturing”) hedgerows. Pollinator numbers and Implementation options: Greater bee diversity was found in mature hedgerows compared to weedy field margins or immature hedgerows, but not in immature hedgerows compared to weedy field margins (data was reported as beta-diversity, which is change in the diversity of species between sites). Twenty-eight percent of bee species were found only in hedgerows. Thirteen percent were found only in weedy edges. Methods: Native, perennial shrubs and trees (3–6 x 350 m) were planted 1–10 years (immature hedgerows) or >10 years (mature hedgerows) before bees were collected. Bees were collected if they touched the reproductive parts of flowers, in one-hour samples of 21 hedgerows and 24 weedy edges, 2–5 times/year, in April–August 2007–2013.