Study

Pest Control and Pollination Cost–Benefit Analysis of Hedgerow Restoration in a Simplified Agricultural Landscape

  • Published source details Morandin L.A., Long R.F. & Kremen C. (2016) Pest Control and Pollination Cost–Benefit Analysis of Hedgerow Restoration in a Simplified Agricultural Landscape. Journal of Economic Entomology, 109, 1-8

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Pollination: Plant hedgerows

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland
  1. Pollination: Plant hedgerows

    A replicated, paired site comparison in 2009–2011 in tomato fields in Yolo County, California, USA, found more native bees, and higher seed-set due to native bees, in fields next to planted hedgerows, compared to fields next to conventional edges. Pollination: Seed-set in canola plants, due to flower visitation by native bees, was higher in fields next to hedgerows, compared to fields next to unplanted edges (21% higher estimated seed yields). Seed-set, as a result of flower visitation by honey bees or syrphid flies, was similar in fields next to hedgerows or unplanted edges (data not reported). Crop visitation: More native bees were found on canola flowers in fields next to hedgerows, compared to fields next to unplanted edges (4.2 vs 1.0 visitors/observation), but similar numbers of honey bees (1.4 vs 2.6), syrphid flies (2.9 vs 3.5), or total visitors (8.4 vs 7.1) were found. Methods: Hedgerows (300–350 m length) were planted along the edges of four treatment fields, but not four control fields, about 10 years before this study began. The edges of control fields were mown, disked, or sprayed with herbicide. Tomatoes were grown in all fields, but pollination was measured in clusters of potted canola plants, placed at four distances from the edges (0, 10, 100, and 200 m), in 2010 and 2011. Flower visitors were observed for four minutes/cluster (one observation period in 2010 and four in 2011). Pollination deficits were measured by comparing seed-set in open-pollinated and hand-pollinated canola flowers.

     

Output references

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