Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The attractiveness of flowering herbaceous plants to bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) and hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) in agro-ecosystems of Central Spain

Published source details

Barbir J., Badenes-Pérez F.R., Fernández-Quintanilla C. & Dorado J. (2015) The attractiveness of flowering herbaceous plants to bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) and hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) in agro-ecosystems of Central Spain. Agricultural and Forest Entomology, 17, 20-28


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Plant flowers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2011–2012 in a barley field near Madrid, Spain, found that more seedlings of five planted flower species, but fewer seedlings of one planted flower species, emerged after no tillage, compared to shallow tillage. Implementation options: A higher density of seedlings emerged after no tillage, compared to shallow tillage, in Calendula arvensis (2011: 4,523 vs 2,817 plants/m2; 2012: 1,223 vs 231), Phacelia tanacetifolia (2011: 318 vs 226; 2012: 116 vs 2), Centauria cyanus (2012: 190 vs 59), Diplotaxis tenuifolia (2012: 153 vs 5), and Echium plantagineum in 2012 (236 vs 2) but not in 2011 (230 vs 235). A lower density of seedlings emerged after no tillage, compared to shallow tillage, in Coriandrum sativum in 2011 (16 vs 314 plants/m2), but not in 2012 (0 vs 2). Similar densities of seedlings emerged after no tillage, compared to shallow tillage, in Borago officinalis (2011: 27 vs 27 plants/m2; 2012: 20 vs 2). Methods: For each of seven flower species, there were three plots (1.3 x 1.3 m). In July, half of each plot was tilled, and half was not. In January, seedlings were counted in quadrats (25 x 25 cm).

 

Pollination: Plant flowers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized study in 2011–2012 in a barley field near Madrid, Spain, found different numbers of flower visitors on different species and mixtures of planted flowers. Implementation options: The highest number of bees were found on Coriandrum sativum in 2012 (1.7 visits/minute) and the lowest number were found on Antirrhinum majus in 2011 (0 visits/minute). The highest number of syrphid flies were found on Lobelia maritima in 2011 (0.9 visits/minute) and the lowest number in 2011 were found on A. majus (0 visits/minute; approximately 0 visits/minute were also seen on all flowers in 2012). The highest number of beetles were found on Echium plantagineum in 2011 (1.2 visits/minute) and the lowest number were found A. majus and Allium schoenoprasum in 2011 (0 visits/minute). Plots with six or seven flower species did not consistently have more or fewer flower visitors than plots with one flower species. Methods: For each treatment (2011: 12 one-species and 2 six-species plantings; 2012: 7 one-species and 1 seven-species plantings), there were three plots (1.3 x 1.3 m). Flower visitors were counted (twice/week, nine minutes/plot) only if they touched the reproductive parts of flowers.