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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Nematode and fungal diseases of food legumes under conservation cropping systems in northern Syria

Published source details

Ahmed S., Piggin C., Haddad A., Kumar S., Khalil Y. & Geletu B. (2012) Nematode and fungal diseases of food legumes under conservation cropping systems in northern Syria. Soil and Tillage Research, 121, 68-73


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Pest regulation: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2005–2011 in a rainfed lentil field and wheat-chickpea-barley-lentil field in Syria found similar amounts of most diseases in plots with no tillage or conventional tillage. Crop damage: A higher incidence of Didymella rabiei Ascochyta blight was found in plots with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage (13–23% vs 4–8%), but there was no difference in disease severity (3.75–5.5 vs 3.25–3.75 on a scale from 0 to 9, where 9 is the most severe). Similar incidences of three other diseases were found in plots with no tillage or conventional tillage (Heteredora cicero cyst nematode disease: 8% vs 9–16% incidence; Fusarium oxysporum lentil Fusarium wilt: 3%; Peronospora lentis downy mildew: 2%). Methods: In one experiment, wheat, chickpeas, barley, and lentils were grown in rotation. In another, lentils were grown in monoculture. In the rotation, no tillage or conventional tillage was used on three plots each, in 2008–2010, and four plots each, in 2009–2011. In the monoculture, there were four plots each (plot size not reported, but sub-subplots were 780 m2). Plots received no tillage (direct drilling) or conventional tillage (cultivation and mouldboard ploughing; depth not reported).