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Individual study: Tillage system did not affect weed diversity in a 23-year experiment in Mediterranean dryland

Published source details

Plaza E.H., Kozak M., Navarrete L. & Gonzalez-Andujar J.L. (2011) Tillage system did not affect weed diversity in a 23-year experiment in Mediterranean dryland. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 140, 102-105


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Pest regulation: Use no tillage instead of reduced tillage Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1985–2008 in a rainfed wheat-vetch field near Madrid, Spain, found fewer weed species in plots with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage. Pest numbers: Fewer weed species were found in plots with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage (6.7 vs 8.3 species), but no differences in the evenness or diversity of weed communities were found (reported as Pielou’s index and Shannon’s index). Methods: Reduced tillage or no tillage was used on four plots each (20 x 40 m). A cultivator and/or a chisel plough were used for reduced tillage (depths not reported). Pre-emergence herbicide was used for no tillage (and the wheat stubble was chopped, before the vetch was planted). Wheat and vetch were grown in rotation. Post-emergence herbicide was used on all plots, when the wheat was tillering. Fertilizer and a seed drill were used on all plots. Weeds were sampled when wheat was tillering or vetch stems were elongating (February–April 1986–2008, 5–20 samples/plot, 30 x 33 cm sampling areas).

 

Pest regulation: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1985–2008 in a rainfed wheat-vetch field near Madrid, Spain, found more weed species in plots with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Pest numbers: More weed species were found in plots with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage (8.3 vs 7.3 species), but no differences in the evenness or diversity of weed communities were found (reported as Pielou’s index and Shannon’s index). Methods: Conventional tillage or reduced tillage was used on four plots each (20 x 40 m). A mouldboard plough and a cultivator were used for conventional tillage (depths not reported). A cultivator and/or a chisel plough were used for reduced tillage (depths not reported). Wheat and vetch were grown in rotation. Post-emergence herbicide was used on all plots, when the wheat was tillering. All plots were fertilized. Weeds were sampled when the wheat was tillering or the vetch stems were elongating (February–April 1986–2008, 5–20 samples/plot, 30 x 33 cm sampling areas).

 

Pest regulation: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1985–2008 in a rainfed wheat-vetch field near Madrid, Spain, found similar numbers of weed species in plots with no tillage or conventional tillage. Pest numbers: Similar numbers of weed species were found in plots with or without tillage (6.7 vs 7.3 species), and no differences in the evenness or diversity of weed communities were found (reported as Pielou’s index and Shannon’s index). Methods: Wheat and vetch were grown in rotation. Conventional tillage or no tillage was used on four plots each (20 x 40 m). A mouldboard plough and a cultivator were used for conventional tillage (depths not reported). Pre-emergence herbicide was used for no tillage (and the wheat stubble was chopped, before the vetch was planted). Post-emergence herbicide was used on all plots, when the wheat was tillering. Fertilizer and a seed drill were used on all plots. Weeds were sampled when the wheat was tillering or the vetch stems were elongating (February–April 1986–2008, 5–20 samples/plot, 30 x 33 cm sampling areas).