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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Spectral reflectance from a broccoli crop with vegetation or soil as background: influence on immigration by Brevicoryne brassicae and Myzus persicae

Published source details

Costello M.J. (1995) Spectral reflectance from a broccoli crop with vegetation or soil as background: influence on immigration by Brevicoryne brassicae and Myzus persicae. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 75, 109-118


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Pest regulation: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1991 in a broccoli field in the Salinas Valley, California, USA (same study as (2)), found more pests in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer. Pest numbers: More aphids were found in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer, in one of eight comparisons (in plots with bare soil, on two of four sampling days: data reported as model results). Methods: Plots (10 x 10 m) had organic fertilizer (compost) or inorganic fertilizer (amounts not reported; four plots for each). Cabbage aphids Brevicoryne brassicae and green peach aphids Myzus persicae were sampled in each plot with two yellow pan traps (12 x 8 x 8 cm traps, 12, 22, 43, and 52 days after transplanting). Pests were also sampled by heat extraction from broccoli leaves (22, 32, 42, 52 and 62 days after transplanting).

 

Pest regulation: Grow cover crops in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1991 in a broccoli field in the Salinas Valley, California, USA (same study as (2)), found fewer pests in plots with cover crops (living mulches) between broccoli plants, compared to bare soil. Pest numbers: Fewer aphids were found in plots with cover crops, compared to bare soil (pan traps: 0.2–2 vs 1–10, in four of 10 comparisons; broccoli leaves: 0.03–0.24 vs 0.25–0.5, in three of 10 comparisons). Implementation options: Similar numbers of aphids were found in plots with different mixtures of cover crops (pan traps: 0.04–0.79; broccoli leaves: 0.03–0.63). Methods: Plots had cover crops or bare soil (four replicates each). The cover crops were white clover Trifolium repens, strawberry clover Trifolium fragiferum, or a mixture of birdsfoot trefoil Lotus corniculatus and red clover Trifolium praetense. Broccoli plants were transplanted into these plots on 18 May 1991. Cabbage aphids Brevicoryne brassicae and green peach aphids Myzus persicae, were sampled in each plot with two yellow and black pan traps (12 x 8 x 8 cm), on 12, 22, 32, 42, and 52 days after transplanting the broccoli. Pests were also sampled by heat extraction on 22, 32, 42, 52, and 62 days after transplanting.