Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Cattle Grazing Mediates Climate Change Impacts on Ephemeral Wetlands

Published source details

Pyke C.R. & Marty J. (2005) Cattle Grazing Mediates Climate Change Impacts on Ephemeral Wetlands. Conservation Biology, 19, 1619-1625


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Water: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in rangelands in central California, USA, found that temporary pools dried earlier in plots from which grazers were excluded, compared to cattle-grazed plots. Water availability: Temporary pools were wet for less time in ungrazed plots, compared to grazed plots (maximum of 65 vs 115 days). Methods: Thirty-six pools in 12 groups on a cattle ranch were studied, 18 of which (six groups) were fenced to exclude cattle. The rest of the ranch was grazed at a density of one cow-calf pair/ha. Pools were monitored each week in the rainy season.

 

Other biodiversity: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in rangelands in central California, USA (same study as (21)), found higher grass cover in plots from which grazers were excluded, compared to cattle-grazed plots. Plants: Grass cover was higher in ungrazed plots, compared to grazed plots (54% vs 30% cover). Methods: Thirty-six pools in 12 groups across a cattle ranch were studied, 18 of which (six groups) had fences erected around them to exclude cattle. The rest of the ranch was grazed at a density of 1 cow-calf pair/ha. Plant cover was monitored in the pools, edges, and surrounding dry land.