Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of tillage systems in dryland farming on near-surface water content during the late winter period

Published source details

Josa R. & Hereter A. (2005) Effects of tillage systems in dryland farming on near-surface water content during the late winter period. Soil and Tillage Research, 82, 173-183


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Water: Use no tillage instead of reduced tillage Mediterranean Farmland

A controlled study in 1994–1999 in a rainfed legume-cereal field near Barcelona, Spain, found more water in soils with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage. Water availability: More water was found in soils with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage (33 vs 29 mm mean topsoil water content in February–May). Methods: No tillage or reduced tillage was used on one plot each (90 x 30 m plots). A cultivator (August), a chisel plough (September), and a harrow and roller (November) were used for reduced tillage (depth not reported). Herbicide was used for no tillage (August). Herbicide was used in both plots in September and January, and fertilizer was added in October. Seeds were sown with a seed drill in December and crops were harvested in July. Crop residues were removed from all plots before tillage. Water was measured weekly (February–May, two time-domain reflectometer probes/plot, 20 cm depth).

 

Water: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A controlled study in 1994–1999 in a rainfed legume-cereal field near Barcelona, Spain, found more water in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Water availability: More water was found in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage (33 vs 26 mm mean topsoil water content in February–May). Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on one plot each (90 x 30 m plots). A cultivator (August), a mouldboard plough (September), and a harrow and a roller (November) were used for conventional tillage (depth not reported). Herbicide was used for no tillage (August). Herbicide was used in both plots in September and January, and fertilizer was added in October. Seeds were sown with a seed drill in December and crops were harvested in July. Crop residues were removed from all plots before tillage. Water was measured weekly (February–May, two time-domain reflectometer probes/plot, 20 cm depth).

 

Water: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A controlled study in 1994–1999 in a rainfed legume-cereal field near Barcelona, Spain, found more water in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Water availability: More water was found in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage (29 vs 26 mm mean topsoil water content in February–May). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on one plot each (90 x 30 m plots). A mouldboard plough was used for conventional tillage, and a chisel plough was used for reduced tillage, in September (depths not reported). Herbicide was used in both plots in September and January, and fertilizer was added in October. Seeds were sown with a seed drill in December and crops were harvested in July. Crop residues were removed from all plots before tillage. Water was measured weekly (February–May, two time-domain reflectometer probes/plot, 20 cm depth).