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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Cover crops lower soil surface strength, may improve soil permeability

Published source details

Folorunso O.A., Rolston D.E., Prichard P.T. & Louie D.T. (1992) Cover crops lower soil surface strength, may improve soil permeability. California Agriculture, 46, 26-27


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Water: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study (years not reported) in an almond orchard in the Central Valley, California, USA, found that more water filtered into soils with ground cover, compared to bare soils. Water availability: More water filtered into soils with ground cover, compared to bare soils (2.2–2.6 vs 1.3 inches in four hours). Methods: There were four plots for each of three ground covers (Blando bromegrass, native vegetation, or strawberry clover) and one control (bare soil). Water infiltration was measured under the ground cover and the controls, after five years.

 

Water: Grow cover crops in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study (years not reported) in a tomato field near Davis, California, USA, found that more water filtered into soils with cover crops, compared to bare soils. Water availability: More water filtered into soils with cover crops, compared to bare soils (8.0–8.3 vs 7.5 inches in four hours). Implementation options: Similar infiltration rates were found under oat-vetch and vetch cover crops (8 vs 8.3 inches in four hours). Methods: There were four plots for each of two cover crops (oat-vetch or vetch, planted in winter) and one control (no cover crop). Water infiltration was measured with an infiltrometer in spring, under the tomato crop that followed the cover crops, after three years of cover cropping.