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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Response of soil microbial activity to grazing, nitrogen deposition, and exotic cover in a serpentine grassland

Published source details

Esch E.H., Hernández D.L., Pasari J.R., Kantor R.S.G. & Selmants P.C. (2012) Response of soil microbial activity to grazing, nitrogen deposition, and exotic cover in a serpentine grassland. Plant and Soil, 366, 671-682


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2008–2010 in grasslands in central California, USA, found no differences in soil respiration between plots with or without cattle excluded. Greenhouse gases: Potential microbial respiration rates did not differ between plots with or without cattle excluded (9–12 µg CO2/g/day). Methods: Ten sets of plots were established in grassland that had been grazed for decades: five plots in 2008 and five plots in 2009. Half of the plots were fenced to exclude cattle and half were left open and typically grazed in winter (approximately 0.25 cow-calf pairs/ha).

 

Other biodiversity: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2008–2010 in grasslands in central California, USA, found no difference in the cover of exotic species in plots from which cattle were excluded, compared to grazed plots. Plants: The cover of exotic species did not differ between plots from which cattle were excluded and grazed plots (data reported as model results). Methods: Ten sets of plots were established in grassland that had been grazed for decades: five in 2008 and five in 2009. Half of the plots were fenced to exclude cattle and half were left open and typically grazed in winter at approximately 0.25 cow-calf pairs/ha.