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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Limited effects of large-scale riparian restoration on seed banks in agriculture

Published source details

Langridge S.M. (2011) Limited effects of large-scale riparian restoration on seed banks in agriculture. Restoration Ecology, 19, 607-616


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Pest regulation: Restore habitat along watercourses Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated site comparison in 1991–2004 in 26 riparian sites along the Sacramento River, California, USA, found more weed seeds in orchards next to restored habitat, compared to remnant habitat. Pest numbers: More weed seeds were found in orchards next to restored habitat, compared to remnant habitat (data reported as log abundance). Implementation options: More weed seeds were found in orchards next to older restored sites, compared to younger restored sites (data not reported). Methods: Soil samples were collected from 26 walnut plots, 0–5.6 km from restored riparian, remnant riparian, and agricultural habitats. Restored sites were formerly farmland. Restoration included disking, burning, furrowing, levelling, and spraying with herbicide, and replanting. On each walnut farm, soil samples (10 cm depth) were collected from seven points adjacent to restored or remnant forest and nine points within the walnut orchard, in March 2004. Seeds were germinated and identified in a greenhouse.

 

Other biodiversity: Restore habitat along watercourses Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated site comparison in 1991–2004 in 26 riparian sites along the Sacramento River, California, USA, found fewer seed species and native seed species, more seeds in total, but fewer native seeds, in orchards next to restored habitats, compared to orchards next to remnant habitats. Plants: Fewer species (36–50 vs 68) and native species (6–10 vs 13) were found in orchards next to restored habitats. More seeds were found next to restored habitats (data reported in log units), but fewer native seeds were found, and there was no difference in invasive seeds. Implementation options: More seeds were found next to older restored habitats, compared to younger (data not reported). Methods: Soil samples were collected from 26 walnut plots, 0–5.6 km from restored riparian, remnant riparian, or agricultural habitats. Restored sites were formerly farmland. Restoration included disking, burning, furrowing, levelling, and spraying with herbicide, and replanting. On each walnut farm, soil samples (10 cm depth) were collected from seven points adjacent to restored or remnant forest and nine points within the walnut orchard, in March 2004. Seeds were germinated and identified in a greenhouse.