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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Willow planting success as influenced by site factors and cattle grazing in northeastern California

Published source details

Conroy S.D. & Svejcar T.J. (1991) Willow planting success as influenced by site factors and cattle grazing in northeastern California. Journal of Range Management, 44, 59-63


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Restore habitat along watercourses Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated study in 1987–1988 in three riparian meadows in the northern Sierra Nevada, California, USA, found that Geyer willow Salix geyeriana cuttings planted on the stream bottom had a higher survival rate than those planted in the streambank or terrace. Plants: Out of 2,700 cuttings, 32% survived in 1987 and 26% survived in 1988. Implementation options: Willow cuttings planted on the stream bottom had a higher survival rate (82%), compared to those planted on the streambank (34%) or the stream terrace (3%). Methods: Geyer willow cuttings were planted (30 cm depth, in May 1987) in three locations (stream bottom, streambank, and stream terrace). At each site, cuttings (over two years old; diameter: 10.5 mm; length: 42.3 cm) were planted along thirty transects perpendicular to the stream, crossing the stream, and extending 10 m from the top of both banks. Survival was measured in September 1987 and 1988.

 

Other biodiversity: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1987–1988 in pastures along three creeks in the northern Sierra Nevada, California, USA, found that Geyer willow Salix geyeriana plantings had similar survival rates in pastures without or with cattle, but fewer were grazed in pastures without cattle. Plants: Similar percentages survived in pastures without or with cattle (33% vs 18–26%), but fewer were grazed in pastures without cattle (0.2 vs 0.7–1). Methods: The cuttings (over two-years old, 10.5 mm diameter, 42.3 cm length) were planted (30 cm depth) along three creeks (Cow, Freeman, and Big Grizzly), on thirty transects (3 m apart) across each creek and extending 10 m from the top of each bank, in May 1987 (300 plantings/creek). Along each creek, three pastures were fenced: one pasture was ungrazed by cattle, one was grazed early (1987: 22 June–7 August; 1988: 21 June–1 July) and one was grazed late (1997: 4 August–23 September; 1988: 18 August–31 August). The cuttings were measured in September 1987 and 1988.