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Individual study: Long-term impact of conservation tillage on stratification ratio of soil organic carbon and loss of total and active CaCO3

Published source details

Moreno F., Murillo J.M., Pelegrín F. & Girón I.F. (2006) Long-term impact of conservation tillage on stratification ratio of soil organic carbon and loss of total and active CaCO3. Soil and Tillage Research, 85, 86-93


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Soil: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2000–2002 in a rainfed sunflower-wheat field near Seville, Spain, found more phosphorus and potassium in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Nutrients: More phosphorus and potassium were found in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in three of 10 comparisons (26–29 vs 20–24 mg phosphorus/kg soil; 313–403 vs 261–313 mg potassium/kg soil). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on three plots each (22 x 14 m plots). A mouldboard plough (25–30 cm depth, in 2000–2001), a cultivator (15–20 cm depth), and a disc harrow (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage, and crop residues were burned. A chisel plough (25–30 cm depth, in 2000), a disc harrow, and pre-emergence herbicide were used for reduced tillage, and crop residues were retained. Soil samples were collected in November 2001, January 2002, and December 2002 (six samples/tillage treatment, 0–40 cm depth). Sunflower was grown in 2001 and it was not fertilized. Wheat was grown in 2001–2002 and it was fertilized.