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Individual study: Soil CO2 fluxes following tillage and rainfall events in a semiarid Mediterranean agroecosystem: Effects of tillage systems and nitrogen fertilization

Published source details

Morell F.J., Álvaro-Fuentes J., Lampurlanés J. & Cantero-Martínez C. (2010) Soil CO2 fluxes following tillage and rainfall events in a semiarid Mediterranean agroecosystem: Effects of tillage systems and nitrogen fertilization. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 139, 167-173


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Water: Use no tillage instead of reduced tillage Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2008 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (5,6)) found more water in soils with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage. Water availability: More water was found in soils with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage (0.09–0.25 vs 0.06–0.21 g water/g dry soil). Methods: No tillage or reduced tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m). A cultivator was used for reduced tillage (10–15 cm depth, 50% incorporation of crop residues). Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Water content was measured in soil samples (0–5 cm depth).

 

Water: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2008 in a rainfed barley field in northeast Spain (same study as (8,9)) found more water in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in some comparisons. Water availability: More water was found in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in 10 of 16 comparisons (0.07–0.21 vs 0.05–0.18 g water/g dry soil). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m). A mouldboard plough or a disc plough was used for conventional tillage (25–30 cm depth, 100% incorporation of crop residues). A cultivator was used for reduced tillage (10–15 cm depth, 50% incorporation of crop residues). Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Water content was measured in soil samples (0–5 cm depth).

 

Water: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2008 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (8,9)), found more water in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Water availability: More water was found in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage (0.09–0.25 vs 0.05–0.18 g water/g dry soil). Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m). A mouldboard plough or a disk plough was used for conventional tillage (25–30 cm depth, 100% incorporation of crop residues). Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Water content was measured in soil samples (0–5 cm depth).

 

Soil: Use no tillage instead of reduced tillage Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2008 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (2,11,12)), found similar amounts of greenhouse gas in soils with no tillage or reduced tillage. Greenhouse gases: Similar amounts of carbon dioxide were found in soils with no tillage or reduced tillage (amounts of carbon dioxide not reported). Methods: No tillage or reduced tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m). A cultivator was used for reduced tillage (10–15 cm depth, 50% incorporation of crop residues). Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Greenhouse gas was sampled with an open chamber (2 samples/plot, 21 cm diameter, 900 mL airflow/minute), in 2005–2008 (several samples within 2 days before and after tillage).

 

Soil: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2008 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (4,23,24,26)), found more greenhouse gas in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Greenhouse gases: More carbon dioxide was found in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage (amounts of carbon dioxide not reported). Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m). A mouldboard plough or a disk plough was used for conventional tillage (25–30 cm depth, 100% incorporation of crop residues). Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Greenhouse gas was sampled in 2005–2008 (two samples/plot, open chamber, 21 cm diameter, 900 mL airflow/minute, several samples within two days before and after tillage).

 

Soil: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2008 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (3,25,26,30)), found more greenhouse gas in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Greenhouse gases: More carbon dioxide was found in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage (amount of carbon dioxide not reported). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m). A mouldboard plough or a disc plough was used for conventional tillage (25–30 cm depth, 100% incorporation of crop residues). A cultivator was used for reduced tillage (10–15 cm depth, 50% incorporation of crop residues). Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Greenhouse gas was sampled with an open chamber (2 samples/plot, 21 cm diameter, 900 mL airflow/minute), in 2005–2008 (several samples within 2 days before and after tillage).