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Individual study: Mediterranean Dryland Farming: Effect of Tillage Practices on Selected Soil Properties

Published source details

Martin-Lammerding D., Hontoria C., Tenorio J.L. & Walter I. (2011) Mediterranean Dryland Farming: Effect of Tillage Practices on Selected Soil Properties. Agronomy Journal, 103, 382-389


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Use crop rotations Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2005–2007 in a wheat field near Madrid, Spain, found less organic matter in soils with wheat-fallow rotations, compared to continuous wheat. Organic matter: Less organic carbon was found in soils with wheat-fallow rotations, compared to soils with continuous wheat, in one of four comparisons (November 2006, 0–7.5 cm depth: 7 vs 8 Mg/ha). Soil erosion and aggregation: No difference in stability was found in soils with or without rotations (25–55% of aggregates were water-stable). Methods: Crop rotation (wheat-fallow) or continuous cropping (wheat-wheat) was used on 12 plots each (10 x 25 m plots) in 2005–2007. All plots were fertilized. Soil samples were collected after the seedbeds were prepared (three samples/plot, 0–15 cm depth), in November 2006 and October 2007.

 

Soil: Use no tillage instead of reduced tillage Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1994–2007 in a rainfed wheat field near Madrid, Spain (same study as (19)), found no differences in organic matter or soil stability in soils with no tillage or reduced tillage. Organic matter: Similar amounts of organic carbon were found in soils with no tillage or reduced tillage (7–11 Mg C/ha). Soil erosion and aggregation: No differences in soil stability were found in plots with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage (25–65% of aggregates were water-stable). Methods: No tillage or reduced tillage was used on eight plots each (10 x 25 m plots), in autumn 1994–2007. A chisel plough (15 cm depth) and a cultivator were used for reduced tillage. Herbicide and direct seeding were used for no tillage. All plots were fertilized. Soil samples were collected after the seedbeds were prepared (three samples/plot, 0–15 cm depth), in November 2006 and October 2007.

 

Soil: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1994–2007 in a rainfed wheat field near Madrid, Spain (same study as (6,37,39)), found more organic matter and higher stability in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Organic matter: More organic carbon was found in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in two of four comparisons (0–7.5 cm depth: 45% more organic carbon). Soil erosion and aggregation: Higher stability was found in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in one of four comparisons (0–7.5 cm depth, October 2007: 63% vs 38% of aggregates were water-stable). Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on eight plots each (10 x 25 m plots), in autumn 1994–2007. A mouldboard plough (20 cm depth) and a cultivator were used for conventional tillage. Herbicide and direct seeding were used for no tillage. All plots were fertilized. Soil samples were collected after the seedbeds were prepared (three samples/plot, 0–15 cm depth), in November 2006 and October 2007.

 

Soil: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1994–2007 in a rainfed wheat field near Madrid, Spain (same study as (35,39)), found more organic matter and higher stability in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Organic matter: More organic carbon was found in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in two of four comparisons (0–7.5 cm depth: 8–9 vs 6–8 Mg C/ha). Soil erosion and aggregation: Higher stability was found in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in one of four comparisons (0–7.5 cm depth, October 2007: 51 vs 38% of aggregates were water-stable). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on eight plots each (10 x 25 m plots), in autumn 1994–2007. A mouldboard plough (20 cm depth) and a cultivator were used for conventional tillage. A chisel plough (15 cm depth) and a cultivator were used for reduced tillage. All plots were fertilized. Soil samples were collected after the seedbeds were prepared (three samples/plot, 0–15 cm depth), in November 2006 and October 2007.