Study

Seed germination enhancement for bald cypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.]

  • Published source details Liu G., Li Y., Hedgepeth M., Wan Y. & Roberts R.E. (2009) Seed germination enhancement for bald cypress [Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich.]. Journal of Horticulture and Forestry, 1, 22-26.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Heat tree/shrub seeds before sowing: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Physically damage tree/shrub seeds before sowing: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Treat tree/shrub seeds with chemicals before sowing: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation

Treat tree/shrub seeds with chemicals before sowing: freshwater wetlands

Action Link
Marsh and Swamp Conservation
  1. Heat tree/shrub seeds before sowing: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated, controlled study in 2004 in a laboratory in Florida, USA (Liu et al. 2009) found that heating baldcypress Taxodium distichum seeds in a flame reduced their germination rate. Heated seeds had a lower germination rate (0% germinated) than unheated seeds (47% germinated). Methods: In August 2004, sixty baldcypress seeds were planted into trays of growing medium. All seeds had been stored at 4°C for four months before the experiment started, and soaked in distilled water for 24 h before planting. Thirty seeds (three replicates of 10 seeds) had also been held in a gas flame for 3 sec before soaking.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  2. Physically damage tree/shrub seeds before sowing: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated, controlled study in 2004 in a laboratory in Florida, USA (Liu et al. 2009) found that cutting baldcypress Taxodium distichum seeds in half reduced their germination rate but had no significant effect on seedling growth. Seeds that had been cut in half had a lower germination rate (20% germinated) than whole seeds (48% germinated). After 30 days, there was no significant difference in the height of seedlings that had grown from cut seeds (8.3 cm) or whole seeds (8.3 cm). Methods: In August 2004, sixty baldcypress seeds were planted into trays of growing medium. All seeds had been stored at 4°C for four months before the experiment started, and soaked in distilled water for 24 h before planting. Thirty seeds (three replicates of 10 seeds) had also been cut in half with scissors before soaking. Germinated seedlings were transplanted to individual pots of growing medium and measured after 30 days.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  3. Treat tree/shrub seeds with chemicals before sowing: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated, controlled study in 2004 in a laboratory in Florida, USA (Liu et al. 2009) found that soaking baldcypress Taxodium distichum seeds in sodium hydroxide NaOH increased their germination rate, but that soaking in hydrochloric acid HCl or ethyl alcohol reduced their germination rate. Seeds soaked in 1% NaOH then water had a higher germination rate (54% germinated) than seeds soaked only in water (47% germinated). Seeds soaked in other chemicals had a lower germination rate than the seeds soaked only in water. This was true for 1% HCl (34% germinated), 95% ethyl alcohol (7% germinated), ethyl alcohol then NaOH (0% germinated), and ethyl alcohol then HCl (7% germinated). After 30 days and in three of four comparisons, there was no significant difference in the height seedlings that had grown from seeds soaked in chemicals (9.3–10.5 cm) or seeds soaked only in water (8.3 cm). In the other comparison, seedlings that had grown from seeds soaked in ethyl alcohol were shorter (4.3 cm) than the seeds soaked only in water. Methods: In August 2004, baldcypress seeds were planted into trays of growing medium. There were three replicates (10 seeds/replicate) for each of six pre-sowing chemical treatments (each involving soaking for 5 min/chemical): NaOH; HCl; ethyl alcohol; ethyl alcohol then NaOH; ethyl alcohol then HCl; or no chemical. All seeds were then soaked in distilled water for 24 h before sowing. All seeds had been stored at 4°C for four months before the experiment started. Germinated seedlings were transplanted to individual pots of growing medium and measured after 30 days.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

  4. Treat tree/shrub seeds with chemicals before sowing: freshwater wetlands

    A replicated, controlled study in 2004–2005 in a laboratory in Florida, USA (Liu et al. 2009) found that soaking baldcypress Taxodium distichum seeds in weak sodium hydroxide NaOH increased their germination rate, but that soaking in stronger NaOH or hydrogen peroxide H2O2 + ethyl alcohol had no significant effect on their germination rate. Seeds soaked in 0.5% NaOH then water had a higher germination rate (45% germinated) than seeds soaked only in water (36% germinated). Seeds soaked in other chemicals had a statistically similar germination rate to seeds soaked only in water. This was true for 2% NaOH (33% germinated), 4% NaOH (36% germinated), 0.03% H2O2 + ethyl alcohol (36% germinated), and 0.3% H2O2 + ethyl alcohol (28% germinated). Methods: In November 2004, baldcypress seeds were planted into trays of growing medium. There were three replicates (12 seeds/replicate) for each of six pre-sowing chemical treatments: 0.5% NaOH for 24 h; 2% NaOH for 24 h; 4% NaOH for 24 h; 0.3% H2O2 + ethyl alcohol for 5 min; 0.03% H2O2 + ethyl alcohol for 5 min; or no chemical. All seeds were then soaked in distilled water for 24 h before sowing. All seeds had been stored at 4°C for four months before the experiment started.

    (Summarised by: Nigel Taylor)

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