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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effect of land use and management on the early stages of soil water erosion in French Mediterranean vineyards

Published source details

Blavet D., De N.G., Le B.Y., Leonard M., Maillo L., Laurent J.Y., Asseline J., Leprun J.C., Arshad M.a. & Roose E. (2009) Effect of land use and management on the early stages of soil water erosion in French Mediterranean vineyards. Soil and Tillage Research, 106, 124-136


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 1999 in a vineyard in southern France found similar amounts of erosion in plots with grass or bare soil between the vine rows. Soil erosion and aggregation: Similar amounts of soil were lost in runoff water from plots with grass or bare soil between the vine rows (26–112 vs 45–207 g soil/m2). Methods: One interrow was cultivated (10 cm depth) and planted with grasses, and one interrow was managed conventionally (with herbicide), for four months each. Rainfall was simulated in three plots, in each interrow, in June 1999 (1 x 1 m plots, 60 mm water/hour, for 60 minutes). Soil loss was measured in each plot (200 observation points/m2).

 

Water: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 1999 in a vineyard in southern France found less runoff from plots with grass, compared to bare soil, between the vine rows. Water availability: Less water was lost as runoff from plots with grass between the vine rows (17–45 vs 26–60 mm runoff/100 mm simulated rainfall). Similar amounts of water infiltration were found in plots with grass or bare soil between the vine rows (9 vs 10 mm). Sediments: Similar amounts of sediment were found in runoff from plots with grass or bare soil between the vine rows (2.7–4.9 vs 3.8–5.7 g soil/litre water). Methods: One interrow was cultivated (10 cm depth) and planted with grasses (without herbicide), and another interrow was chemically weeded (with herbicide: conventional management), for four months each. Rainfall was simulated in three plots (1 x 1 m plots) in each interrow (1 x 1 m plots, 60 mm water/hour, for 60 minutes). Soil samples were collected in each plot (200 observation points/m2; 5 topsoil samples/plot, 0–5 cm depth).