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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Vineyard δ15N, nitrogen and water status in perennial clover and bunch grass cover crop systems of California's central valley

Published source details

King A.P. & Berry A.M. (2005) Vineyard δ15N, nitrogen and water status in perennial clover and bunch grass cover crop systems of California's central valley. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 109, 262-272


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A study in 1998–2002 in an irrigated vineyard in the Sacramento Valley, California, USA, found more nitrogen in soil that was cover cropped with legumes, compared to grasses. Implementation options: More nitrogen was found in soil that was cover cropped with legumes, compared to grasses (0.26% vs 0.22% total nitrogen). Methods: A leguminous cover crop (Trifolium fragiferum perennial strawberry clover) was planted in the southern half of the vineyard, and three native Californian, perennial, summer-dormant grasses (Elymus glaucus blue wildrye, Hordeum brachyantherum meadow barley, and Bromus carinatus California brome) were planted in the northern half. These cover crops were planted between every other vine row. They were mown 4–5 times/year and their residues were retained. The vineyard was fertigated with drip lines. Soil samples were collected in five sub-plots, in one 10 x 15 m plot, in each cover crop (0–10 cm depth, 3 cm diameter, nine times in July 2001–October 2002).

 

Water: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A study in 1998–2002 in an irrigated vineyard in the Sacramento Valley, California, USA, found more water in soil that was cover cropped with legumes, compared to grasses, in summer, but found less water in winter. Implementation options: More water was found in soil that was cover cropped with legumes, compared to grasses, in the dry season (13% vs 6% water content), but less water was found in the wet season, after a flood (28% vs 33%). Methods: A leguminous cover crop (Trifolium fragiferum perennial strawberry clover) was planted in the southern half of the vineyard, and three native Californian, perennial, summer-dormant grasses (Elymus glaucus blue wildrye, Hordeum brachyantherum meadow barley, and Bromus carinatus California brome) were planted in the northern half. These cover crops were planted between every other vine row. They were mown 4–5 times/year and their residues were retained. The vineyard was fertigated with drip lines. Soil samples were collected in five sub-plots, in one 10 x 15 m plot, in each cover crop (0–10 cm depth, 3 cm diameter, nine times in July 2001–October 2002).