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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Weed control and cover crop management affect mycorrhizal colonization of grapevine roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal spore populations in a California vineyard

Published source details

Baumgartner K., Smith R.F. & Bettiga L. (2005) Weed control and cover crop management affect mycorrhizal colonization of grapevine roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal spore populations in a California vineyard. Mycorrhiza, 15, 111-119


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 2001–2003 in an irrigated vineyard in the Salinas Valley, California, USA (same study as (6)), found more fungal spores in soils between vine rows with cover crops, compared to those without cover crops. Soil organisms: More fungal spores (mycorrhizae) were found in soils with cover crops, in at least one of three seasons (spring: 110–130 vs 70 spores/g soil). Similar numbers of vine roots were colonized by mycorrhizae in vine rows with or without cover crops (data not reported). Methods: There were nine plots (0.045 ha) for each of two cover crops (Secale cereale Merced rye or Triticosecale triticale, in the central 80 cm of the 240 cm between vine rows, which were disked every year in November, before they were planted, and were mown every year in spring), and there were nine control plots (bare soil between the vine rows, which were disked every month). Soil and vine roots (8 cm root and 10 g soil from 20 vines/plot, 0–30 cm depth) were collected in summer (July 2002), winter (February 2003), and spring (April 2003). Cover-crop roots were collected in winter and spring. Spores and fungal colonies were measured in soil and roots.

 

Pest regulation: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 2001–2003 in an irrigated vineyard in the Salinas Valley, California, USA, found more weeds under grape vines in vine rows with cover crops, compared to vine rows without cover crops. Pest numbers: More weeds were found under grape vines in rows with cover crops, compared to rows without cover crops, in one of nine comparisons (in winter, in cultivated rows: 65–80% vs 35% weed frequency). Methods: There were nine plots (0.045 ha) for each of two cover crops (Secale cereale Merced rye or Triticosecale triticale, in the central 80 cm of the 240 cm between the vine rows, which were disked every year in November, before they were planted, and were mown every year in spring), and there were nine control plots (bare soil between the vine rows, which were disked every month). One-third of the plots were cultivated under the vine rows. Weeds were sampled in summer (June 2002), winter (March 2003), and spring (May 2003) on 30.5 m transects.