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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The potential of organic fertilizers and water management to reduce N2O emissions in Mediterranean climate cropping systems. A review

Published source details

Aguilera E., Lassaletta L., Sanz-Cobena A., Garnier J. & Vallejo a. (2013) The potential of organic fertilizers and water management to reduce N2O emissions in Mediterranean climate cropping systems. A review. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 164, 32-52


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Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A meta-analysis from 2013 of studies in Mediterranean climates found that nitrous oxide emissions from soils were lower after adding organic fertilizer, compared to synthetic fertilizer. Greenhouse gases: Nitrous oxide emissions were 23% lower after adding organic fertilizer, compared to synthetic fertilizer. Implementation options: Nitrous oxide emissions were lower after adding solid organic fertilizer, but not liquid organic fertilizer, compared to synthetic fertilizer (solid: 28% lower; liquid: 8% lower). Methods: Solid organic fertilizers included cover-crop residues, manure, composed manure, composted municipal solid waste, and composted thick fractions of digested pig slurries. Liquid organic fertilizers included raw or digested pig slurries. Synthetic fertilizers included ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, urea, and NPK. Eight studies were included in the meta-analysis. These studies were found by searching the Web of Knowledge database, using the terms “nitrous oxide” or “N2O” and “emission” and “Mediterranean” or the name of a country with a Mediterranean climate, and also by searching the references in the publications that were found.