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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Nitrogen oxide emissions affected by organic fertilization in a non-irrigated Mediterranean barley field

Published source details

Meijide A., García-Torres L., Arce A. & Vallejo a. (2009) Nitrogen oxide emissions affected by organic fertilization in a non-irrigated Mediterranean barley field. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, 132, 106-115


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Water: Add slurry to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2009 in a rainfed barley field in Spain found similar amounts of water-filled pore space in soils with or without added slurry. Water availability: Similar amounts of water-filled pore space were found in soils with or without added slurry (20–60%). Implementation options: Similar amounts of water-filled pore space were found in soils with untreated or digested slurry (20–60%). Methods: Plots (30 m2) had no fertilizer or pig slurry (anaerobically-digested pig slurry or untreated), applied in January 2006 (125 kg N/ha; three plots for each) and incorporated into the soil using a rotocultivator (0–5 cm depth). Phosphate and potassium (75 and 40 kg/ha, respectively) were added to all plots. Soil samples were taken every 1–2 weeks during crop period and three times during fallow period (0–10 cm depth), but no samples were taken in June–October (the soil was too dry).

 

Water: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2009 in a rainfed barley field in Spain found similar amounts of water-filled pore space in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer. Water availability: Similar amounts of water-filled pore space were found in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer (20–60%). Methods: Plots (30 m2) had organic fertilizer (pig slurry, anaerobically-digested pig slurry, municipal solid waste, or composted crop residue with sludge) or inorganic fertilizer (urea), applied in January 2006 (125 kg N/ha; three plots for each fertilizer) and incorporated into the soil using a rotocultivator (0–5 cm depth). Phosphate and potassium (75 and 40 kg/ha, respectively) were added to all plots. Soil samples were taken every 1–2 weeks during crop period and three times during fallow period (0–10 cm depth), but no samples were taken in June–October (the soil was too dry).

 

Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2009 in a rainfed barley field in Spain found similar nitrous oxide emissions in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizers. Greenhouse gases: Similar nitrous oxide emissions were found in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizers (266–373 vs 345 g/ha). Lower nitric oxide emissions were found from plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizers, in three of four comparisons (29–45 vs 62 g/ha). Methods: Plots (30 m2) had organic fertilizer (pig slurry, anaerobically-digested pig slurry, municipal solid waste, or composted crop residue with sludge) or inorganic fertilizer (urea), applied in January 2006 (125 kg N/ha; three plots for each fertilizer) and incorporated into the soil using a roto-cultivator (0–5 cm depth). Phosphate and potassium (75 and 40 kg/ha, respectively) were added to all plots. Greenhouse gases were measured in manual chambers (35 cm diameter, 20 cm height), four times in the first week after fertilizer application, 2–3 times/week in the first month, and once/week until the end of the cropping season or until emissions were close to zero.