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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Comparison of N losses (NO3, N2O, NO) from surface applied, injected or amended (DCD) pig slurry of an irrigated soil in a Mediterranean climate

Published source details

Vallejo A., García-Torres L., Díez J.A., Arce A. & López-Fernández S. (2005) Comparison of N losses (NO3, N2O, NO) from surface applied, injected or amended (DCD) pig slurry of an irrigated soil in a Mediterranean climate. Plant and Soil, 272, 313-325


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Water: Add slurry to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002 in irrigated farmland in Spain found that more nitrate was leached from plots with added slurry, compared to plots without it. Nutrients: More nitrate was leached from plots with added slurry (0.08–2 vs 0.1 g N/m2). Implementation options: Less nitrate was leached from plots with surface application, compared to injection, of slurry (0.8 vs 2 g N/m2). Methods: Plots (3 x 3 m) growing tall fescue Festuca arundinacea had pig slurry (surface application or injection, 200 kg N/ha) or no fertilizer (three plots each). Each plot had a lysimeter (1 x 1 m, 0.75 m depth) to measure leaching. Slurry was injected (5 L/m) or applied with a watering can. Water (5 L/plot) was added to the control plots. All plots were sprinkler-irrigated (June–August: daily; September: twice/week). Soil cores were taken from the centre of the plots (0–10 cm depth).

 

Soil: Add slurry to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002 in irrigated arable farmland in Spain found higher nitrous oxide emissions in plots with added slurry, compared to plots without it. Greenhouse gases: Higher nitrous oxide emissions were found in plots with added slurry, compared to plots without it, in one of two comparisons (1.1 vs 0.5 g N/m2). Implementation options: Similar nitrous oxide emissions were found in plots with surface application, compared to injection, of slurry (0.8 vs 1 g N/m2). Methods: Plots (3 x 3 m) growing tall fescue Festuca arundinacea had pig slurry (surface application or injection, 200 kg N/ha) or no fertilizer (three plots each). Each plot had a lysimeter (1 x 1 m, 0.75 m depth) to measure leaching. Slurry was injected (5 L/m) or applied with a watering can. Water (5 L/plot) was added to the control plots. All plots were sprinkler-irrigated (June–August: daily; September: twice/week). Soil cores were taken from the centre of the plots (0–10 cm depth). Gas samples were taken (chambers, 30 cm diameter, 30 cm height) twice/day for 1–4 days after slurry application, every 2–3 days from 7 to 40 days after application, once/week in July and August, and every fortnight in September–December.