Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Denitrification from an irrigated soil fertilized with pig slurry under Mediterranean conditions

Published source details

Vallejo A., Díez J.A., López-Valdivia L.M., Cartagena M.C., Tarquis A. & Hernaiz P. (2004) Denitrification from an irrigated soil fertilized with pig slurry under Mediterranean conditions. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 40, 93-100


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Add slurry to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 1998–1999 in irrigated arable farmland in Spain found more nitrate in soils with added slurry, compared to soils without it. Nutrients: More nitrate was found in soils with added slurry, compared to soils without it (40–90 vs 10–22 mg/kg). Methods: Plots (10 × 11 m) had added pig slurry (165 kg/ha) or no added fertilizer (three replicates each). Slurry was incorporated into the soil, five days after application, using a rotocultivator (0–5 cm depth). Soil samples were taken during the first 15 days after application and every 2 weeks thereafter.

 

Water: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 1998–1999 in an irrigated maize field in Spain found that similar amounts of nitrogen were lost from plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer. Nutrients: Similar amounts of nitrogen were lost from plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer added (2.3–2.5 vs 2.5–2.9 g/m2). Methods: Plots (10 × 11 m) had pig slurry (165 kg/ha) or urea (165 kg/ha) (three plots each). Slurry was incorporated into the soil, five days after application, using a rotocultivator (0–5 cm depth). Water samples were taken during the first 15 days after application and every 2 weeks thereafter.