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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Modification of Infiltration Rates in an Organic-Amended Irrigated Soil

Published source details

Martens D.A. & Frankenberger W.T. (1992) Modification of Infiltration Rates in an Organic-Amended Irrigated Soil. Agronomy Journal, 84, 707-717


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Water: Add manure to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 1997–1998 in irrigated fallow land in California, USA, found similar amounts of water in soils with or without added manure. Water availability: Similar moisture content was found in soils with or without added manure (111 vs 101 g/kg). Methods: Plots (2 x 2 m) had added poultry manure (25 Mg/ha) or no added fertilizer (five plots for each). Manure was added in April 1987, February 1988, and October 1988 and was immediately incorporated into the soil (15 cm depth). Plots were irrigated weekly (100 mm/day). Five soil samples (25–100 mm depth) were taken from each plot.

 

Water: Add sewage sludge to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 1997–1998 in irrigated fallow land in California, USA, found similar moisture content in plots with or without added sewage sludge. Water availability: Similar moisture content was found in plots with or without added sewage sludge (117 vs 108 g/kg). Methods: Plots (2 x 2 m) had sewage sludge (25 Mg/ha) or no added fertilizer (five plots each). Sewage sludge was added in April 1987, February 1988, and October 1988 and was immediately incorporated into the soil (15 cm depth). Plots were irrigated weekly (100 mm/day). Five soil samples (25–100 mm depth) were taken from each plot.

 

Soil: Add manure to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 1997–1998 in irrigated fallow land in California, USA, found more organic matter and higher carbon dioxide emissions in plots with added manure, compared to plots without manure added. Organic matter: More organic matter was found in soils with added manure (16 vs 10 g/kg). Soil erosion and aggregation: Similar aggregate stability was found in soils with or without added manure (366 vs 300 g/kg). Greenhouse gases: Higher carbon dioxide emissions were found in plots with added manure (3 vs 1 carbon dioxide µg/g/day). Methods: Plots (2 x 2 m) had poultry manure (25 Mg/ha) or no added fertilizer (five plots each). Manure was added in April 1987, February 1988, and October 1988 and was immediately incorporated into the soil (15 cm depth). Plots were irrigated weekly (100 mm/day). Five soil samples (25–100 mm depth) were taken from each plot.

 

Soil: Add sewage sludge to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, controlled study in 1997–1998 in irrigated fallow land in California, USA, found more organic matter and carbon dioxide in soils with added sewage sludge, compared to soils without it. Organic matter: More organic matter was found in soils with added sewage sludge, compared to soils without it (19 vs 10 g/kg). Soil erosion and aggregation: Similar amounts of water-stable aggregates were found in soils with or without added sewage sludge (367 vs 300 g/kg). Greenhouse gases: Higher carbon dioxide emissions were found in plots with added sewage sludge compared to plots without it (4 vs 1 µg/g/day). Methods: Plots (2 x 2 m) had sewage sludge (25 Mg/ha) or no added fertilizer (five plots each). Sewage sludge was added in April 1987, February 1988, and October 1988, and immediately incorporated into the soil (15 cm depth). Plots were irrigated weekly (100 mm/day). Five soil samples (25–100 mm depth) were taken from each plot.