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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Microbial 16S gene-based composition of a sorghum cropped rhizosphere soil under different fertilization managements

Published source details

Lavecchia A., Curci M., Jangid K., Whitman W.B., Ricciuti P., Pascazio S. & Crecchio C. (2015) Microbial 16S gene-based composition of a sorghum cropped rhizosphere soil under different fertilization managements. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 51, 661-672


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2015 in a sorghum field in southern Italy found inconsistent differences in bacteria abundance between soils with or without added compost, but found higher bacteria diversity in soils with added compost. Soil organisms: Higher bacteria abundance was found in soils with added compost, in three of 32 comparisons (Actinobacteria and one other group: 111–2,017 vs 32–1,746 phylotype 16S rRNA sequences), but lower bacteria abundance was found in three of 32 comparisons (Gemmatimonadetes and Proteobacteria: 80–1,658 vs 141–1,810 sequences). Higher bacteria diversity was found in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost, in one of many comparisons (with double compost application: data reported as Chao 1 index). Implementation options: Higher bacteria abundance was found in plots with a double application of compost, compared to single application, in one of 16 comparisons (Proteobacteria: 1,658 vs 1,469 sequences), but lower bacteria abundance was found in one of 16 comparisons (another group: 34 vs 111 sequences). Methods: Compost was added to eight treatment plots (single application: 130 kg N/ha; double application: 260 kg N/ha), but not four control plots (5 x 8 m plots). After three years of compost addition, plants were dug up (three plants/plot) and soil that was clinging to plant roots was collected for sampling bacteria (through RNA sequencing).

 

Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2015 in a sorghum field in Italy found inconsistent differences in bacteria between plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer. Soil organisms: More bacteria were found in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer, in three of 32 comparisons (111–2,017 vs 201,690 phylotype 16S rRNA sequences), but fewer were found in three of 32 comparisons (60–1,658 vs 103–1,858 sequences). Implementation options: More bacteria were found in plots with a double application of organic fertilizer, compared to a single application, in one of 16 comparisons (1,658 vs 1,469 sequences), but less were found in one of 16 comparisons (34 vs 111 sequences). Methods: Plots (5 x 8 m) had inorganic fertilizer (130 kg urea/ha) or compost (single application: 130 kg N/ha; double application: 260 kg N/ha) (four plots for each). After three years of compost addition, plants were dug up (three plants/plot) and soil that was clinging to plant roots was collected for sampling bacteria (through RNA sequencing).