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Individual study: How do biodegradable organic residues affect soil CO2 emissions? Case study of a Mediterranean agro-ecosystem

Published source details

González-Ubierna S., de l.C.M.T. & Casermeiro M.A. (2015) How do biodegradable organic residues affect soil CO2 emissions? Case study of a Mediterranean agro-ecosystem. Soil and Tillage Research, 153, 48-58


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Soil: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2010–2011 in the Jarama river basin, Spain, found more carbon dioxide and higher soil stability, but rarely found more organic matter, in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost. Organic matter: Higher percentages of organic carbon were found in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost, in one of five comparisons (spring 2010, immediately after adding compost: 72% vs 85% unhydrolyzed carbon), but not in four of five comparisons (summer 2010–spring 2011: 63–72% vs 55–72%). Soil erosion and aggregation: Larger soil aggregates were found in plots with added compost, compared to plots without added compost (3.0–3.4 vs 0.7–1.3 mm mean weight diameter). Greenhouse gases: More carbon dioxide was found in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost (amounts of carbon dioxide not reported). Three plots (10 x 15 m) were fertilized with municipal solid waste compost in spring 2010, and three plots were not fertilized. Carbon dioxide was measured once every two weeks (three open chambers/plot, 20 cm diameter, 5 cm deep in the soil). Soil cores were collected (three 100 cm2 soil cores/plot) for other measurements.