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Individual study: Thirteen years of continued application of composted organic wastes in a vineyard modify soil quality characteristics

Published source details

Calleja-Cervantes M.E., Fernández-González A.J., Irigoyen I., Fernández-López M., Aparicio-Tejo P.M. & Menéndez S. (2015) Thirteen years of continued application of composted organic wastes in a vineyard modify soil quality characteristics. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 90, 241-254


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2011 in a vineyard in Navarra, Spain, found more organic matter, nutrients, and greenhouse-gas emissions in soils with some types of added compost, compared to soils without added compost. Organic matter: A higher percentage of organic matter was found in plots with added compost, compared to plots without added compost, for one of three types of compost (SMC: 1.8 vs 1.2% organic matter). Nutrients: More nitrogen, phosphorus, and/or potassium were found in plots with some types of added compost, compared to plots without added compost. The largest differences were between plots with added sheep-manure compost and plots without added compost (nitrogen: 0.10% vs 0.06%; phosphorus: 81 vs 30 mg/kg; potassium oxide: 474 vs 232 mg/kg). Similar pH was found in all plots (7.34–7.41). Soil organisms: Similar bacteria communities were found in all plots, for 11 of 12 bacteria genera. However, in plots with added compost, a higher percentage of RNA sequences came from Rhizobium species, for two types of compost (SMC: 0.3%; OF-MSW: 0.5%), but not for one type (PEL: 0.2%), compared to plots without added compost (0.1%). Greenhouse gases: Higher greenhouse-gas emissions were found in plots with added compost, for one type of compost (OF-MSW: 1,745 kg CO2 equivalent/ha; cumulative over 115 days after adding compost or fertilizer), but not for two types (SMC: 1,591 kg; PEL: 1,598 kg), compared to plots without added compost (1,104 kg). Higher nitrous oxide emissions were found in plots with added compost, compared to plots without added compost (1.8–5.1 vs 1.7 g N2O–N/ha/day; 15 days after compost). Methods: Three types of compost were compared: pelletized organic compost (PEL), compost from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OF-MSW), and sheep-manure compost (SMC). Each of three compost treatments and one control was assigned to a plot (15 vines), and there were three blocks (the size of plots within blocks was not clearly reported). The vines were planted in 1996. Compost was added in February 1998–2011 (PEL: 3,700 kg fresh weight/ha/year; OF-MSW: 4,075 kg; SMC: 4,630 kg). For N, P, K, and pH measurements, soil samples were taken at the end 2011 (four/plot, 0–30 cm depth). For greenhouse-gas measurements, ambient air samples (20 ml, 10/plot, closed chamber technique) were taken over 115 days after adding compost. For partial prokaryotic 16S rRNA sequencing, soil samples (four/plot, 5–30 cm depth) were taken 15 days after adding compost.

 

Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2011 in a vineyard in Navarra, Spain, found more organic matter and nutrients, and higher greenhouse-gas emissions, in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer. Organic matter: More organic matter was found in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer, in one of three comparisons (SMC compost: 1.8% vs 1.1%). Nutrients: More nitrogen (in two of three comparisons: 0.1% vs 0.06%), phosphorus (65–81 vs 29 mg/kg), and potassium (potassium oxide, in one of three comparisons: 474 vs 253 mg/kg) were found in soils with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer. Soil organisms: Similar bacteria communities were found in all plots, for 11 of 12 bacteria genera. However, in plots fertilized with compost, a lower percentage of RNA sequences came from Nitrosporia or Nitrosolobus species (0.0–0.1%), compared to plots fertilized with inorganic fertilizer (0.2%). Greenhouse gases: Higher greenhouse-gas emissions were found in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer (1,591–1,745 vs 1,053 kg CO2 equivalent/ha, cumulative over 115 days after fertilizer). Similar nitrous oxide emissions were found in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer (1.8–5.1 g N2O-N/ha/day, 15 days after fertilizer). Methods: Three types of organic fertilizer (compost) were compared with one mineral fertilizer (MIN): pelletized organic compost (PEL), compost from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OF-MSW), and sheep-manure compost (SMC). Each treatment was assigned to a plot (15 vines), and there were three blocks (the size of plots within blocks was not clearly reported). Compost or fertilizer was added in February 1998–2011 (PEL: 3,700 kg fresh weight/ha/year; OF-MSW: 4,075 kg; SMC: 4,630 kg; MIN: 340 kg NPK/ha/year). For N, P, K, and pH measurements, soil samples were taken at the end of 2011 (four samples/plot, 0–30 cm depth). For greenhouse-gas measurements, air samples (20 ml, 10 samples/plot, closed chambers) were taken over 115 days after adding fertilizer. For partial prokaryotic 16S rRNA sequencing, soil samples (four/plot, 5–30 cm depth) were taken 15 days after adding fertilizer.