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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of compost, mycorrhiza, manure and fertilizer on some physical properties of a Chromoxerert soil

Published source details

Celik I., Ortas I. & Kilic S. (2004) Effects of compost, mycorrhiza, manure and fertilizer on some physical properties of a Chromoxerert soil. Soil and Tillage Research, 78, 59-67


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Water: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995–1999 in arable farmland in southern Turkey found more water in soils with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer. Water availability: More available water was found in soils with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer (0.14–0.17 vs 0.09 cm3 water/cm3 soil). Methods: There were three plots (10 x 20 m) for each of three treatments: cattle manure (25 t/ha), compost (25 t/ha), or mineral fertilizer (160 kg N/ha, 26 kg P/ha, 83 kg P/ha). The compost was made of grass, stubble, and leaves. Wheat, sweet peppers, maize, and wheat were grown in rotation. Soils were sampled in 1999, after harvesting the last wheat crop (0–30 cm depth). The difference between water retention capacity at field capacity (–33 kPa) and at permanent wilting point (–1,500 kPa) was used to determine available water content.

 

Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995–1999 in arable farmland in southern Turkey found more organic matter and greater stability in soils with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer. Organic matter: More organic matter was found in soils with compost, compared to mineral fertilizer, at one of two depths (0–15 cm: 1.8% vs 1.7%). Similar amounts of organic matter were found in soils with manure, compared to mineral fertilizer (1.6–1.8% vs 1.6%). Soil erosion and aggregation: Larger particles were found in soils with compost, compared to mineral fertilizer, at one of two depths (0–15 cm: 0.38 vs 0.27 mm mean weight diameter). Larger particles were found in soils with manure, compared to mineral fertilizer (0.38–0.43 vs 0.19–0.29 mm mean weight diameter). Methods: There were three plots (10 x 20 m) for each of three treatments: cattle manure (25 t/ha), compost (25 t/ha), or mineral fertilizer (160 kg N/ha, 26 kg P/ha, 83 kg P/ha). The compost was made of grass, stubble, and leaves. Wheat, sweet peppers, maize, and wheat were grown in rotation. Soils were sampled in 1999, after harvesting the last wheat crop (0–30 cm depth). Wet sieving was used to determine mean weight diameter.

 

Water: Add manure to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995–1999 in arable farmland in southern Turkey found more available water in soils with added manure, compared to soils without added manure. Water availability: More available water was found in soils with added manure, compared to soils without added manure (0.14 vs 0.09 cm3 water/cm3 soil). Methods: Cattle manure (25 t/ha) was added to three treatment plots (10 x 20 m), but not three control plots. Wheat, sweet peppers, and maize were grown in rotation. Soils were sampled in 1999, after harvesting the last wheat crop (0–30 cm depth). The difference between water retention at field capacity (–33 kPa) and at permanent wilting point (–1,500 kPa) was used to determine available water content.

 

Soil: Add manure to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995–1999 in arable farmland in southern Turkey found more organic matter and greater soil stability in soils with added manure, compared to soils without added manure. Organic matter: More organic matter was found in soils with added manure, compared to soils without added manure, in one of two comparisons (1.8% vs 1.6%). Soil erosion and aggregation: Larger soil particles were found in plots with added manure, compared to plots without added manure (0.38–0.43 vs 0.18–0.29 mm mean weight diameter). Methods: Cattle manure (25 t/ha) was added to three treatment plots (10 x 20 m), but not three control plots. Wheat, sweet peppers, and maize were grown in rotation. Soils were sampled in 1999, after harvesting the last wheat crop (0–30 cm depth). Wet sieving was used to determine mean weight diameter.

 

Water: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995–1999 in farmland in southern Turkey found more available water in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost. Water availability: More available water was found in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost (0.17 vs 0.09 cm3 water/cm3 soil). Methods: Compost (25 t/ha) was added to three treatment plots (10 x 20 m), but not three control plots. The compost was made of grass, stubble, and leaves. Wheat, sweet peppers, maize, and wheat were grown in rotation. Soils were sampled in 1999, after harvesting the last wheat crop. The difference between water retention at field capacity (–33 kPa) and at permanent wilting point (–1,500 kPa) was used to determine available water content.

 

Soil: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995–1999 in farmland in southern Turkey found more organic matter and greater soil stability in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost, at some depths. Organic matter: More organic matter was found in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost, at one of two depths (0–15 cm: 1.8% vs 1.6%). Soil erosion and aggregation: Larger soil particles were found in plots with added compost, compared to plots without added compost, at one of two depths (15–30 cm: 0.31 vs 0.18 mm mean weight diameter). Methods: Compost (25 t/ha) was added to three treatment plots (10 x 20 m), but not three control plots. The compost was made of grass, stubble, and leaves. Wheat, sweet peppers, maize, and wheat were grown in rotation. Soils were sampled in 1999, after harvesting the last wheat crop (0–30 cm depth). Wet sieving was used to determine mean weight diameter.