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Individual study: Winter cereal root growth and aboveground–belowground biomass ratios as affected by site and tillage system in dryland Mediterranean conditions

Published source details

Plaza-Bonilla D., Álvaro-Fuentes J., Hansen N.C., Lampurlanés J. & Cantero-Martínez C. (2014) Winter cereal root growth and aboveground–belowground biomass ratios as affected by site and tillage system in dryland Mediterranean conditions. Plant and Soil, 374, 925-939


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Water: Use no tillage instead of reduced tillage Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1987–2010 in rainfed cereal fields in the Ebro river valley, Spain, found less water in soils with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage. Water availability: Less water was found in soils with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage, in one of 15 comparisons (in Selvanera: 110 vs 150 mm volumetric water content). Methods: No tillage or reduced tillage was used on ten plot each (Peñalba: three plots each, 34 x 175 m plots, established in 2005; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots, established in 1990; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots, established in 1987). A cultivator (Peñalba: 10 cm depth; Agramunt: 15 cm) or a chisel plough (Selvanera: 15 cm) was used for reduced tillage. Herbicide was used for no tillage. Barley (Peñalba) or wheat (Agramunt and Selvanera) was planted in November 2009 with a seed drill (2–4 cm depth) and harvested in June–July 2010.

 

Water: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1987–2010 in rainfed cereal fields in the Ebro river valley, Spain, found more water in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Water availability: More water was found in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in three of 15 comparisons (in Agramunt: 140–240 vs 100–210 mm volumetric water content). Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on ten plot each (Peñalba: three plots each, 34 x 175 m plots, established in 2005; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots, established in 1990; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots, established in 1987). In Peñalba, a disk plough (20 cm depth) and a cultivator (10 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Agramunt, a mouldboard plough (25 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Selvanera, a subsoil plough (40 cm depth) and a chisel plough (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. Herbicide was used for no tillage. Barley (Peñalba) or wheat (Agramunt and Selvanera) was planted in November 2009 with a seed drill (2–4 cm depth) and harvested in June–July 2010. Soil samples were collected two times (at tillering and flowering, four samples/plot, 0–90 cm depth).

 

Crop production: Use no tillage instead of reduced tillage Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1987–2010 in rainfed cereal fields in the Ebro river valley, Spain, found higher crop yields in plots with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage. Crop yield: Higher grain yields were found in plots with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage (4,449 vs 3,923 kg/ha). Methods: No tillage or reduced tillage was used on ten plot each (Peñalba: three plots each, 34 x 175 m plots, established in 2005; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots, established in 1990; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots, established in 1987). A cultivator (Peñalba: 10 cm depth; Agramunt: 15 cm) or a chisel plough (Selvanera: 15 cm) was used for reduced tillage. Herbicide was used for no tillage. Barley (Peñalba) or wheat (Agramunt and Selvanera) was planted in November 2009 with a seed drill (2–4 cm depth) and harvested in June–July 2010.

 

Water: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1987–2010 in rainfed cereal fields in the Ebro river valley, Spain, found more water in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Water availability: More water was found in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in one of 15 comparisons (in Selvanera: 150 vs 110 mm volumetric water content). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on ten plot each (Peñalba: three plots each, 34 x 175 m plots, established in 2005; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots, established in 1990; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots, established in 1987). In Peñalba, a disk plough (20 cm depth) and a cultivator (10 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Agramunt, a mouldboard plough (25 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Selvanera, a subsoil plough (40 cm depth) and a chisel plough (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. A cultivator (Peñalba: 10 cm depth; Agramunt: 15 cm) or a chisel plough (Selvanera: 15 cm) was used for reduced tillage. Barley (Peñalba) or wheat (Agramunt and Selvanera) was planted in November 2009 with a seed drill (2–4 cm depth) and harvested in June–July 2010. Soil samples were collected two times (at tillering and flowering, four samples/plot, 0–90 cm depth).

 

Crop production: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1987–2010 in rainfed cereal fields in the Ebro river valley, Spain, found higher crop yields in plots with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Crop yield: Higher grain yields were found in plots with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage (4,449 vs 4,210 kg/ha). Crop quality: Heavier grains were found in plots with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage (35 vs 32 mg/grain). Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on ten plot each (Peñalba: three plots each, 34 x 175 m plots, established in 2005; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots, established in 1990; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots, established in 1987). In Peñalba, a disk plough (20 cm depth) and a cultivator (10 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Agramunt, a mouldboard plough (25 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Selvanera, a subsoil plough (40 cm depth) and a chisel plough (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. Herbicide was used for no tillage. Barley (Peñalba) or wheat (Agramunt and Selvanera) was planted in November 2009 with a seed drill (2–4 cm depth) and harvested in June–July 2010.

 

Crop production: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1987–2010 in rainfed cereal fields in the Ebro river valley, Spain, found lower crop yields in plots with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Crop yield: Lower grain yields were found in plots with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage (3,923 vs 4,210 kg/ha). Crop quality: No difference in grain weight was found between plots with reduced tillage or conventional tillage (34 vs 32 mg/grain). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on ten plot each (Peñalba: three plots each, 34 x 175 m plots, established in 2005; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots, established in 1990; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots, established in 1987). In Peñalba, a disk plough (20 cm depth) and a cultivator (10 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Agramunt, a mouldboard plough (25 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Selvanera, a subsoil plough (40 cm depth) and a chisel plough (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. A cultivator (Peñalba: 10 cm depth; Agramunt: 15 cm) or a chisel plough (Selvanera: 15 cm) was used for reduced tillage. Barley (Peñalba) or wheat (Agramunt and Selvanera) was planted in November 2009 with a seed drill (2–4 cm depth) and harvested in June–July 2010.