Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Soil Carbon Dioxide Flux and Organic Carbon Content: Effects of Tillage and Nitrogen Fertilization

Published source details

Morell F.J., Cantero-Martínez C., Lampurlanés J., Plaza-Bonilla D. & Álvaro-Fuentes J. (2011) Soil Carbon Dioxide Flux and Organic Carbon Content: Effects of Tillage and Nitrogen Fertilization. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 75, 1874-1884


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Crop production: Use no tillage instead of reduced tillage Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2009 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (4,6)), found similar crop yields in plots with no tillage or reduced tillage. Crop yield: Similar barley yields were found in plots with no tillage, compared to reduced tillage (1,350–4,400 vs 1,050–4,100 kg/ha). Methods: No tillage or reduced tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m plots). A cultivator was used for reduced tillage (10–15 cm depth, 50% incorporation of crop residues), in October or November. A seed drill and herbicide were used for no tillage. Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Mature barley was harvested in June 2006–2009.

 

Crop production: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2009 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (4,12,13,15)), found that tillage had inconsistent effects on the yield of barley straw. Crop yield: More barley straw was found in plots with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in one of six comparisons (511 vs 242 g/m2), but less barley straw was found in one of six comparisons (332 vs 541). In one of three years, the barley crop failed with conventional tillage, but not with no tillage. Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m plots). A mouldboard plough was used for conventional tillage (25–30 cm depth, 100% incorporation of crop residues). A seed drill and herbicide were used for no tillage. Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Mature barley was harvested in June 2006–2009 (three samples/plot, 50 cm of one row/sample).

 

Crop production: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2009 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (3,12,13,17)), found higher crop yields in plots with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Crop yield: Higher barley yields were found in plots with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage (1,792 vs 1,155 kg/ha). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m plots) in October or November. A mouldboard plough was used for conventional tillage (25–30 cm depth, 100% incorporation of crop residues). A cultivator was used for reduced tillage (10–15 cm depth, 50% incorporation of crop residues). Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Mature barley was harvested in June 2006–2009.

 

Soil: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2009 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (4,17,23,26)), found that tillage had inconsistent effects on greenhouse-gas emissions from soils. Greenhouse gases: Higher carbon dioxide emissions were found in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in three of four comparisons, but lower emissions were found in one of four comparisons (amounts of carbon dioxide not clearly reported). Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m plots). A mouldboard plough was used for conventional tillage (25–30 cm depth, 100% incorporation of crop residues). A seed drill and herbicide were used for no tillage. Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Carbon dioxide was measured with an open chamber (21 cm diameter, 900 mL airflow/minute, 2 samples/plot/day, every 7–14 days, in 2006–2009).

 

Soil: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1996–2009 in a rainfed barley field in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (3,20,26,30)), found higher greenhouse-gas emissions in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Greenhouse gases: Higher carbon dioxide emissions were found in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in three of four comparisons (amounts of carbon dioxide not clearly reported). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on nine plots each (50 x 6 m plots). A mouldboard plough was used for conventional tillage (25–30 cm depth, 100% incorporation of crop residues). A cultivator was used for reduced tillage (10–15 cm depth, 50% incorporation of crop residues). Two-thirds of the plots were fertilized (60 or 120 kg N/ha). Carbon dioxide was measured with an open chamber (21 cm diameter, 900 mL airflow/minute, 2 samples/plot/day, every 7–14 days, in 2006–2009).