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Individual study: Management Effects on Soil Carbon Dioxide Fluxes under Semiarid Mediterranean Conditions

Published source details

Álvaro-Fuentes J., López M.V., Arrúe J.L. & Cantero-Martínez C. (2008) Management Effects on Soil Carbon Dioxide Fluxes under Semiarid Mediterranean Conditions. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 72, 194-200


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Crop production: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002–2005 on three rainfed farms in the Ebro river valley, Spain, found lower crop yields in plots with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Crop yield: Lower barley yields were found in plots with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in four of 10 comparisons (730–3,083 vs 1,314–3,514 kg/ha). Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on ten plots each (Peñaflor: three plots each, 33 x 10 m plots; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots). In Peñaflor, a mouldboard plough (30–40 cm depth) and a cultivator (10–15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Agramunt, a mouldboard plough (25–30 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Selvanera, a subsoil plough (40 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. Herbicide and a seed drill were used for no tillage.

 

Crop production: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002–2005 on three rainfed farms in the Ebro river valley, Spain, found that tillage had inconsistent effects on crop yield. Crop yield: Lower crop yields were found in plots with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in three of 10 comparisons (barley: 2,273–3,071 vs 2,493–3,514 kg/ha; wheat: 1,830 vs 2,703), but higher yields were found in two of 10 comparisons (rapeseed: 1,783 vs 1,261 kg/ha; wheat: 911 vs 798). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on ten plots each (Peñaflor: three plots each, 33 x 10 m plots; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots). In Peñaflor, a mouldboard plough (30–40 cm depth) and a cultivator (10–15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Agramunt, a mouldboard plough (25–30 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Selvanera, a subsoil plough (40 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. A cultivator (Agramunt and Selvanera: 15 cm depth) or chisel plough (Peñaflor: 25–30 cm depth) was used for reduced tillage.

 

Soil: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002–2005 on three rainfed farms in the Ebro river valley, Spain, found similar amounts of greenhouse gas in soils with reduced tillage or conventional tillage. Greenhouse gases: Similar amounts of carbon dioxide were found in soils with reduced tillage or conventional tillage (0.11–1.65 vs 0.12–1.76 g CO2/m2/hour). Methods: Reduced tillage or conventional tillage was used on ten plots each (Peñaflor: three plots each, 33 x 10 m plots; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots). In Peñaflor, a mouldboard plough (30–40 cm depth) and a cultivator (10–15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Agramunt, a mouldboard plough (25–30 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Selvanera, a subsoil plough (40 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. A cultivator (Agramunt and Selvanera: 15 cm) or chisel plough (Peñaflor: 25–30 cm depth) was used for reduced tillage. Carbon dioxide samples were collected from December 2002 (Peñaflor, twice/month) or December 2003 (Agramunt and Selvanera, once/month) to June 2005, with an open chamber (900 mL airflow/minute, 21 cm diameter).

 

Soil: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002–2005 on three rainfed farms in the Ebro river valley, Spain (same study as (5)), found less greenhouse gas in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Greenhouse gases: Less carbon dioxide was found in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage, in three of 13 comparisons (0.27–0.85 vs 0.54–1.19 g CO2/m2/hour). Methods: No tillage or conventional tillage was used on ten plots each (Peñaflor: three plots each, 33 x 10 m plots; Agramunt: four plots each, 9 x 50 m plots; Selvanera: three plots each, 7 x 50 m plots). In Peñaflor, a mouldboard plough (30–40 cm depth) and a cultivator (10–15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Agramunt, a mouldboard plough (25–30 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. In Selvanera, a subsoil plough (40 cm depth) and a cultivator (15 cm depth) were used for conventional tillage. Herbicide and a seed drill were used for no tillage. Carbon dioxide samples were collected from December 2002 (Peñaflor, twice/month) or December 2003 (Agramunt and Selvanera, once/month) to June 2005, with an open chamber (900 mL airflow/minute, 21 cm diameter).