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Individual study: Alternative Crop Rotations under Mediterranean No-Tillage Conditions: Biomass, Grain Yield, and Water-Use Efficiency

Published source details

Álvaro-Fuentes J., Lampurlanés J. & Cantero-Martínez C. (2009) Alternative Crop Rotations under Mediterranean No-Tillage Conditions: Biomass, Grain Yield, and Water-Use Efficiency. Agronomy Journal, 101, 1227-1233


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Water: Use crop rotations Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1999–2005 in a rainfed cereal field in northeast Spain found that wheat used water less efficiently in plots with crop rotations, compared to continuous wheat. Water use: Wheat used water less efficiently in plots with crop rotations, compared to continuous wheat, in two of four comparisons (7–8 vs 9 kg grain/mm water/ha), but there was not a significant difference in water-use efficiency in barley, with or without crop rotations (10–11 vs 9). Similar amounts of water were used by cereals, in plots with or without rotations (wheat phase: 335–345 vs 300 mm; barley phase: 288–297 vs 293 mm). Implementation options: There was no difference in the water-use efficiency of cereals between wheat-barley-rapeseed and wheat-barley-vetch rotations (wheat: 7.2 vs 7.5 kg grain/mm water/ha; barley: 10.3 vs 10.9). Methods: Continuous wheat (one plot), continuous barley (one plot), a wheat-barley-rapeseed Brassica napus rotation (one plot/phase), or a wheat-barley-vetch Vicia sativa rotation (one plot/phase) were grown in each of three blocks. Each plot was 50 x 8 m. Wheat and barley were sown in early November (450 seeds/m2). Vetch and rapeseed were sown in late September to early October (150 and 80 seeds seeds/m2, respectively). Fertilizer was used on all plots (except vetch phases) in January and February. Herbicide was used in all plots.

 

Crop production: Use crop rotations Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1999–2005 in a rainfed cereal field in northeast Spain found higher barley yields in plots with rotations, compared to continuous barley. Crop yield: Higher barley yields were found in plots with rotations, compared to continuous barley, in one of two comparisons (2,716 vs 2,192 kg/ha). Similar wheat yields were found in plots with or without rotations (1,981–2,125 vs 2,272 kg/ha). Similar aboveground biomass was found in cereal plots with or without rotations (6–9 vs 7–8 t/ha). Methods: Continuous wheat (one plot), continuous barley (one plot), a wheat-barley-rapeseed Brassica napus rotation (one plot/phase), or a wheat-barley-vetch Vicia sativa rotation (one plot/phase) were grown in each of three blocks. Each plot was 50 x 8 m. Wheat and barley were sown in early November (450 seeds/m2). Vetch and rapeseed were sown in late September to early October (150 and 80 seeds seeds/m2, respectively). Fertilizer was used on all plots (except vetch phases) in January and February. Herbicide was used in all plots.