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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Long-term trends in botanical composition relative to herbivore use on moorlands in Aberdeenshire, Kincardinshire and Perthshire, north-east Scotland

Published source details

Welch D. & Scott D. (1995) Studies in the grazing of heather moorland in northeast Scotland. VI. 20-year trends in botanical composition. Journal of Applied Ecology, 32, 596-611


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Increase number of livestock Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A site comparison in 1967-1987 in 15 heathland sites in the UK (Welch et al. 1995) found that common heather Calluna vulgaris cover decreased at sites with high livestock density. Over 20 years cover of common heather increased in sites with low livestock density but decreased in sites with high livestock density (no data reported). Ten point quadrats were used to estimate vegetation cover at each sites in July or August every two years. Dung was counted to assess herbivore abundance at each site.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)

Reduce number of livestock Shrubland and Heathland Conservation

A site comparison in 1967-1987 in 15 heathland sites in the UK (Welch & Scott 1995) found that common heather Calluna vulgaris cover decreased at sites with high livestock density. Over 20 years cover of common heather increased in sites with low livestock density but decreased in sites with high livestock density (no data reported). Ten point quadrats were used to estimate vegetation cover at each sites in July or August every two years. Dung was counted to assess herbivore abundance at each site.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)