Study

Management of chestnut plantations for a multifunctional land use under Mediterranean conditions: effects on productivity and sustainability

  • Published source details Martins A., Marques G., Borges O., Portela E., Lousada J., Raimundo F. & Madeira M. (2011) Management of chestnut plantations for a multifunctional land use under Mediterranean conditions: effects on productivity and sustainability. Agroforestry Systems, 81, 175-189

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Other biodiversity: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland

Crop production: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland
  1. Other biodiversity: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2001–2008 in a chestnut orchard in northeast Portugal found more mushrooms and mushroom species in plots with cover crops (without tillage), compared to plots without cover crops (with conventional tillage). Fungi: More mushrooms, more mushroom species, and greater mushroom diversity were found in plots with cover crops, compared to plots without cover crops (85–115 vs 20 kg fresh weight/ha; 18–23 vs 11 species; diversity reported as Shannon Index). Implementation options: Fewer mushrooms and fewer mushroom species were found in plots with seeded cover crops, compared to resident vegetation (85 vs 115 kg fresh weight/ha; 18 vs 23 species), but there was no difference in mushroom diversity (reported as Shannon Index). Methods: There were three plots for each of two treatments (resident vegetation or grasses and legumes, sown in 2001; both without tillage), and there were three control plots (conventional tillage, 15–20 cm depth, thrice/year). Each plot (600 m2) had six chestnut trees (40 years old in 2001) and was fertilized but not irrigated. Mushrooms were collected in 2006–2008 (weekly in May–July and September–November, under three trees/plot). It was not clear whether these results were a direct effect of cover crops or tillage.

     

  2. Crop production: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2001–2008 in a chestnut orchard in northeast Portugal (same study as (7)) found higher mushroom and chestnut yields, and larger chestnuts, in plots with ground cover (without tillage), compared to plots with conventional tillage (without ground cover). Crop yield: Higher edible mushroom yields were found in plots with ground cover, compared to conventional tillage (43 vs 6 kg fresh weight/ha), and higher chestnut yields were also found in one of two comparisons (with resident vegetation: 27 vs 19 kg dry matter/tree). Crop quality: Larger chestnuts were found in plots with ground cover, compared to conventional tillage (10–11 vs 9 g/fruit; 26–27 vs 25 mm size index). Implementation options: Lower crop yields and smaller chestnuts were found in plots with seeded cover crops, compared to resident vegetation (edible mushrooms: 45 vs 59 kg fresh weight/ha; chestnuts: 20 vs 27 kg dry matter/tree; 11 vs 10 g/fruit; 26 vs 27 mm size index). Methods: There were three plots for each of two treatments (no tillage with ground cover: grasses and legumes, sown in 2001, or resident vegetation), and there were three control plots (conventional tillage, 15–20 cm depth, thrice/year). Each plot (600 m2) had six chestnut trees (40 years old in 2001) and was fertilized but not irrigated. Chestnuts were sampled thrice/plot in 2003–2006. Mushrooms were collected in 2006–2008 (weekly in May–July and September–November, under three trees/plot). It was not clear whether these results were a direct effect of ground cover or tillage.

     

Output references

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