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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Residual effects of fertilization with pig slurry: Double cropping and soil

Published source details

Yagüe M. R. & Quílez D. (2013) Residual effects of fertilization with pig slurry: Double cropping and soil. Agronomy Journal, 105, 70-78


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Crop production: Add slurry to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2000–2005 in an irrigated barley-maize field in Spain found higher crop yields in plots with added slurry, compared to plots without it. Crop yield: Higher yields were found in plots with added slurry, compared to plots without it (4–6 vs 3 Mg/ha). Methods: Plots (3.8 x 2.5 m) had added slurry (30, 60, 90, or 120 Mg/ha) or no fertilizer (three plots for each) in 2000–2003. Phosphorus (120 kg P2O5/ha) and potassium (180 kg KCl/ha) were added to all plots in 2003 and 2004. Barley was sown in December 2003 and harvested in June 2004. Maize was sown in July 2004 and harvested in December.

 

Crop production: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2000–2005 in an irrigated barley-maize field in Spain found lower barley and maize yields in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer. Crop yield: Lower yields were found in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer (barley, in one of two comparisons: 4–6 vs 8 Mg/ha; maize: 4–6 vs 8 Mg/ha). Methods: Plots (3.8 x 2.5 m) had inorganic fertilizer (150 kg N/ha/year) or organic fertilizer (slurry: 30, 60, 90, or 120 Mg/ha/year) in 2000–2003. Phosphorus (120 kg P2O5/ha) and potassium (180 kg KCl/ha) were added to all plots in 2003 and 2004. Barley was sown in December 2003 and harvested in June 2004. Maize was sown in July 2004 and harvested in December.

 

Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2000–2005 in an irrigated barley-maize field in Spain found more water-stable aggregates in soils with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer. Soil erosion and aggregation: More water-stable aggregates were found in soils with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer (15–17% vs 6%). Methods: Plots (3.8 x 2.5 m) had inorganic fertilizer (barley: 150 kg N/ha/year; maize: 100 kg N/ha/year) or organic fertilizer (slurry: 30, 60, 90, or 120 Mg/ha/year) in 2000–2003 (three plots for each). Phosphorus (120 kg P2O5/ha) and potassium (180 kg KCl/ha) were added to all plots in 2003 and 2004. Barley was sown in December 2003 and harvested in June 2004. Maize was sown in July 2004 and harvested in December.