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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Cumulative and residual effects of swine slurry and mineral nitrogen in irrigated maize

Published source details

Yagüe M. R. & Quílez D. (2010) Cumulative and residual effects of swine slurry and mineral nitrogen in irrigated maize. Agronomy Journal, 102, 1682-1691


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Crop production: Add slurry to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2000–2003 in an irrigated maize field in Spain found higher crop yields in plots with added slurry, compared to plots without it. Crop yield: Higher maize yields were found in plots with added slurry, compared to plots without it, in two of three comparisons (7–12 vs 6–7 Mg/ha). Methods: Plots (3.8 x 2.5 m) had added slurry (30, 60, 90, or 120 Mg/ha) or no fertilizer (three plots for each). Maize was harvested in November each year.

 

Crop production: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2000–2003 in an irrigated maize field in northeast Spain found lower crop yields in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer. Crop yield: Lower maize yields were found in plots with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer, in one of four years (2003: 7–9 vs 10 Mg/ha). Methods: Plots (3.8 x 2.5 m) had inorganic fertilizer (150 kg N/ha) or organic fertilizer (pig slurry: 30, 60, 90, or 120 Mg/ha) (three plots for each). Maize was harvested in November each year.