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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effect of Liquid Cattle Manure on Corn Yield, Composition, and Soil Properties

Published source details

Lithourgidis A.S., Matsi T., Barbayiannis N. & Dordas C.A. (2007) Effect of Liquid Cattle Manure on Corn Yield, Composition, and Soil Properties. Agronomy Journal, 99, 1041-1047


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Crop production: Add manure to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002–2005 in an irrigated maize field in Greece found higher maize yields in plots with added manure, compared to plots without added manure. Crop yield: Higher maize yields were found in plots with added manure, compared to plots without added manure, in two of three comparisons (11–14 vs 10–12 Mg/ha). Methods: Plots (5.6 x 8 m) had liquid cow manure (80 Mg/ha/year) or no added fertilizer (six plots each). The manure was incorporated into the soil with a disk harrow (12–15 cm depth) within two hours of application. Grain yield was measured at the end of October (two rows/plot, 12.8 m2).

 

Crop production: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002–2005 in a maize field in Greece found similar crop yields in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer. Crop yield: Similar maize yields were found in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer (12–14 vs 12–13 Mg/ha).  Methods: Plots (5.6 x 8 m) had organic fertilizer (liquid cow manure: 80 Mg/ha/year) or inorganic fertilizers (260 kg N ha/year and 57 kg P/ha/year) (six plots each). Fertilizers were incorporated into the soil with a disk harrow (12–15 cm depth) within two hours of application. Grain yield was measured in two rows (12.8 m2) in each plot, at the end of October.

Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002–2005 in an irrigated maize field in Greece found similar amounts of carbon and nitrogen in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer. Organic matter: Similar amounts of organic carbon were found in soils with organic or inorganic fertilizer (5.7 vs 5.5 g C/kg). Nutrients: Similar amounts of nitrogen were found in soils with organic or inorganic fertilizer (0.81 vs 0.79 g Kjeldahl N/kg, 0–30 cm depth). Methods: Plots (5.6 x 8 m) had organic fertilizer (liquid cow manure 80 Mg/ha/year, before sowing) or inorganic fertilizer (260 kg N/ha/year and 57 kg P/ha/year, before sowing) (six plots each). Fertilizers were incorporated with a disk harrow (12–15 cm depth) within two hours of application. Soil samples were collected at the end of the growing season in 2005 (three samples/plot, 0–30 cm depth).

 

Soil: Add manure to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2002–2005 in an irrigated maize field in Greece found similar amounts of organic matter in soils with or without added manure. Organic matter: Similar amounts of carbon were found in soils with or without added manure (5.7 vs 5.3 g/kg). Nutrients: Similar amounts of nitrogen were found in soils with or without added manure (0.81 vs 0.72 g N/kg). More phosphorus and potassium was found in soils with added manure, compared to soils without added manure (15–21 vs 4–11 mg P/kg; 67–85 vs 46–75 mg K/kg). Methods: Plots (5.6 x 8 m) had liquid cow manure (80 Mg/ha/year) or no added fertilizer (six plots each). The manure was incorporated into soil with a disk harrow (12–15 cm depth) within two hours of application. Soil samples were collected at the end of the growing season in 2005 (three samples/plot, 0–30 cm depth).