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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Towards a more sustainable fertilization: Combined use of compost and inorganic fertilization for tomato cultivation

Published source details

Hernandez T., Chocano C., Moreno J. & Garcia C. (2014) Towards a more sustainable fertilization: Combined use of compost and inorganic fertilization for tomato cultivation. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 196, 178-184


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Crop production: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2013 in greenhouses in southeast Spain found higher fruit yields in tomatoes with added compost, compared to tomatoes without added compost. Crop yield: Higher fruit yields were found in tomatoes with added compost, compared to tomatoes without added compost, in one of four comparisons (compost R1, with low doses of mineral fertilizer: 5.8 vs 4.2 kg fresh weight fruit/ha). Methods: There were four replicates for each of four treatments (50.5 t/ha of compost R1 or 40 t/ha of compost R2, with low or medium doses of mineral fertilizer) and two controls (low or medium doses of mineral fertilizer). Mineral fertilizer (Hoagland’s solution) was added in two of three waterings (medium dose) or one of five waterings (low dose). Compost R1 was made from sheep and goat manure. Compost R2 was made from alperujo (olive-mill waste), manure, and olive prunings. Ripe red fruits were harvested each week (91- to 161-day-old plants).

Soil: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2013 in greenhouses in southeast Spain found more soil organisms, but similar amounts of carbon dioxide, in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost. Soil organisms: More microbial biomass (measured as carbon) was found in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost (280–330 vs 130–160 mg C/kg soil). Greenhouse gases: Similar amounts of carbon dioxide were found in soils with and without added compost (8–19 vs 7–15 mg CO2-C/kg soil/day). There were four replicates for each of four treatments (50.5 t/ha of compost R1 or 40 t/ha of compost R2, with low or medium doses of mineral fertilizer) and two controls (low or medium doses of mineral fertilizer). Mineral fertilizer (Hoagland’s solution) was added in two of three waterings (medium dose) or one of five waterings (low dose). Compost R1 was made from sheep and goat manure. Compost R2 was made from alperujo, manure, and olive prunings.