Study

Carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from a barley field amended with organic fertilizers under Mediterranean climatic conditions

  • Published source details Meijide A., Cárdenas L.M., Sánchez-Martín L. & Vallejo a. (2010) Carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from a barley field amended with organic fertilizers under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Plant and Soil, 328, 353-367

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Crop production: Add slurry to the soil

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland

Soil: Add slurry to the soil

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland

Crop production: Add compost to the soil

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland

Crop production: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland

Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland

Soil: Add compost to the soil

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland
  1. Crop production: Add slurry to the soil

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2006 in a barley field in the Henares river basin, Spain, found higher crop yields in plots with added slurry, compared to plots without it. Crop yield: Higher barley yields were found in plots with added slurry, compared to plots without it, in one of two comparisons (digested slurry: 2,381 vs 1,825 kg grain and straw/ha). Implementation options: Similar barley yields were found in plots with digested slurry or untreated slurry (2,381 vs 2,117 kg grain and straw/ha). Methods: There were three plots (30 m2) for each of two treatments (anaerobically digested thin fraction of pig slurry or untreated pig slurry) and there were three control plots (no slurry). Slurry was applied at a rate of 125 kg available N/ha, in January. Plots were cultivated (5 cm depth) to incorporate the slurry. Barley was planted in January and harvested in June.

     

  2. Soil: Add slurry to the soil

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2006 in a barley field in the Henares river basin, Spain, found no difference in greenhouse-gas emissions between soils with or without added slurry. Greenhouse gases: No differences in greenhouse-gas emissions were found between soils with or without added slurry (digested slurry, carbon dioxide: 465 vs 411 kg C/ha; methane: –287 vs –294 mg C/m2; untreated slurry, carbon dioxide: 447 vs 411; methane: –229 vs –294). Implementation options: No differences in greenhouse-gas emissions were found between soils fertilized with digested slurry, compared to untreated slurry (carbon dioxide: 465 vs 447 kg C/ha; methane: –287 vs –229 mg C/m2). Methods: There were three plots (30 m2) for each of two treatments (anaerobically digested thin fraction of pig slurry or untreated pig slurry) and three control plots (no slurry). Slurry was applied in January (125 kg available N/ha). Plots were cultivated (5 cm depth) to incorporate the slurry. Barley was planted in January and harvested in June. Greenhouse-gas emissions were measured with closed chambers (35 cm diameter, 25 cm height, 1–4 measurements/plot/week, 23 January–28 November).

     

  3. Crop production: Add compost to the soil

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2006 in a barley field in the Henares river basin, Spain, found similar barley yields in plots with or without added compost. Crop yield: Similar barley yields were found in plots with or without added compost (1,879 vs 1,825 kg grain and straw/ha). Methods: Composted municipal solid waste (125 kg available N/ha) was added to three treatment plots, but not to three control plots, in January. Plots were 30 m2. Plots were cultivated (5 cm depth) to incorporate the compost into the soil. Barley was planted in January and harvested in June.

     

  4. Crop production: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2006 in a barley field in the Henares river basin, Spain, found similar crop yield in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer. Crop yield: Similar barley yields were found in plots with organic or inorganic fertilizer (1,879–2,381 vs 2,079 kg grain and straw/ha). Methods: There were three plots (30 m2) for each of four organic fertilizers (anaerobically digested thin fraction of pig slurry, untreated pig slurry, composted municipal solid waste, or sewage sludge and composted crop residues) and one mineral fertilizer (urea), applied in January (125 kg available N/ha). Plots were cultivated (0–5 cm depth) to incorporate the fertilizers. Barley was planted in January and harvested in June.

     

  5. Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2006 in a barley field in the Henares river basin, Spain, found that more methane was absorbed by soils with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer. Greenhouse gases: More methane was absorbed by soils with organic fertilizer, compared to inorganic fertilizer, in one of four comparisons (digested slurry: –286 vs –115 mg C/m2). No differences in carbon dioxide emissions were found between soils with organic fertilizers or urea (334–466 vs 458 kg C/ha). Methods: There were three plots (30 m2) for each of four organic fertilizers (anaerobically digested thin fraction of pig slurry, untreated pig slurry, composted municipal solid waste, or sewage sludge and composted crop residues) and one mineral fertilizer (urea), applied in January (125 kg available N/ha). Plots were cultivated (0–5 cm depth) to incorporate the fertilizers. Barley was planted in January and harvested in June. Greenhouse-gas emissions were measured with closed chambers (35 cm diameter, 25 cm height, 1–4 measurements/plot/week, 23 January–28 November).

     

  6. Soil: Add compost to the soil

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2006 in a barley field in the Henares river basin, Spain, found no difference in greenhouse-gas emissions between soils with or without added municipal waste compost. Greenhouse gases: No difference in greenhouse-gas emissions was found between soils with or without added compost (carbon dioxide: 466 vs 411 kg C/ha; methane: –231 vs –294 mg C/m2). Methods: Composted municipal solid waste (125 kg available N/ha) was added to three treatment plots, but not three control plots, in January. Plots were 30 m2. Plots were cultivated (0–5 cm depth) to incorporate the compost. Barley was planted in January and harvested in June. Greenhouse-gas emissions were measured with closed chambers (35 cm diameter, 25 cm height, 1–4 measurements/plot/week, 23 January–28 November).

     

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