Study

Field assessment of soil quality as affected by compost and fertilizer application in a broccoli field (San Benito County, California)

  • Published source details Stamatiadis S., Werner M. & Buchanan M. (1999) Field assessment of soil quality as affected by compost and fertilizer application in a broccoli field (San Benito County, California). Applied Soil Ecology, 12, 217-225

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Crop production: Add compost to the soil

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland

Soil: Add compost to the soil

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland

Water: Add compost to the soil

Action Link
Mediterranean Farmland
  1. Crop production: Add compost to the soil

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995 in a broccoli field in the Salinas Valley, California, USA, found similar broccoli yields in plots with or without added compost. Crop yield: Similar broccoli yields were found in plots with or without added compost (13–15 Mg/ha). Implementation options: In plots with added compost, similar broccoli yields were found with or without added fertilizer (13–15 vs 14–15 Mg/ha). Methods: There were four plots for each of three compost treatments (0, 22, or 44 Mg/ha). Fertilizer (165 kg ammonium nitrate/ha) was added to half (6.1 x 7.7 m) of each plot. The compost was made from green wastes (>30%), cow manure (>20%), spoiled hay (>15%), clay soil (>5%), and crop processing residues. Crops were harvested and weighed on 10, 14, and 17 November 1995.

  2. Soil: Add compost to the soil

    A replicated, randomized, controlled, study in 1995 in a broccoli field in the Salinas Valley, California, USA, found similar amounts of nitrate, pH levels, and carbon dioxide emissions in soils with or without added compost. Nutrients: Similar amounts of nitrate, and similar pH levels, were found in soils with or without added compost (3–10 vs 2 kg NO3-N/ha; pH 8.1–8.3 vs 8.1). Greenhouse gases: Similar carbon dioxide emissions were found in soils with or without added compost (soil respiration: 17–32 vs 63 kg CO2-C/ha/day). Methods: There were four plots for each of three compost treatments (0, 22, or 44 Mg/ha). Fertilizer (165 kg ammonium nitrate/ha) was added to half (6.1 x 7.7 m) of each plot. The compost was made from green wastes (>30%), cow manure (>20%), spoiled hay (>15%), clay soil (>5%), and crop processing residues. Soil samples were collected on 11 October 1995 (0–7.6 cm depth).

     

  3. Water: Add compost to the soil

    A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995 in a broccoli field in the Salinas Valley, California, USA, found similar amounts of water in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost. Water availability: Similar amounts of water were found in soils with or without added compost (17–18% vs 17% water by weight). Methods: There were four plots for each of three compost treatments (0, 22, or 44 Mg/ha). Fertilizer (165 kg ammonium nitrate/ha) was added to half (6.1 x 7.7 m) of each plot. The compost was made from green wastes (>30%), cow manure (>20%), spoiled hay (>15%), clay soil (>5%), and crop processing residues. Soil samples were collected on 24 October 1995 (0–20 cm depth).

     

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust