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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Managing soil carbon for climate change mitigation and adaptation in Mediterranean cropping systems: A meta-analysis

Published source details

Aguilera E., Lassaletta L., Gattinger A. & Gimeno B.S. (2013) Managing soil carbon for climate change mitigation and adaptation in Mediterranean cropping systems: A meta-analysis. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 168, 25-36


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Add slurry to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A meta-analysis from 2013 of studies in Mediterranean climates found similar percentages of organic carbon in soils with or without added slurry. Organic matter: There was no difference in organic carbon between soils with or without added slurry (2% higher in soils with slurry). Methods: Slurry included liquid pig and cattle manure, both raw and digested. The Web of Knowledge database was searched, using the keywords, “Mediterranean”, “soil”, and “conventional”, and 3 data sets from 3 studies of slurry amendment were found and meta-analysed. The most recent studies included in this meta-analysis were published in 2011.

 

Soil: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A meta-analysis from 2013 of studies from multiple Mediterranean countries found a higher percentage of organic matter in soils with cover crops, compared to bare soils. Organic matter: A higher percentage of organic carbon was found in soils with cover crops, compared to bare soils (10% higher). The Web of Knowledge database was searched, using the keywords, “Mediterranean”, “soil”, and “conventional”, and 13 data sets from 10 studies of cover cropping were found and meta-analysed. The most recent studies included in this meta-analysis were published in 2011. It was not clear how many of these studies were from arable fields, orchards, or vineyards.

 

Soil: Use organic fertilizer instead of inorganic Mediterranean Farmland

A meta-analysis from 2013 of studies in Mediterranean climates found a higher percentage of organic carbon in soils with added organic matter, compared to conventionally fertilized soils. Soil organic matter: A higher percentage of soil organic carbon was found with than without added organic matter (24% higher). Methods: The Web of Knowledge database was searched, using the keywords, “Mediterranean”, “soil”, and “conventional”, and 37 data sets from 26 studies of organic amendment were found and meta–analysed. The most recent studies included in this meta–analysis were published in 2011.

 

Soil: Grow cover crops in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A meta-analysis from 2013 of studies in multiple countries with Mediterranean-type climates found a higher percentage of organic matter in soils with cover crops, compared to bare soils. Organic matter: A higher percentage of organic carbon was found in soils with cover crops, compared to bare soils (10% higher). Methods: The Web of Knowledge database was searched, using the keywords, “Mediterranean”, “soil”, and “conventional”, and 13 data sets from 10 studies of cover cropping were found and meta-analysed. The most recent studies included in this meta-analysis were published in 2011. It was not clear how many of these studies were from arable fields, orchards, or vineyards.

 

Soil: Use no tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A meta-analysis in 2013 of studies from multiple Mediterranean countries found a higher percentage of organic matter in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Organic matter: A higher percentage of organic carbon was found in soils with no tillage, compared to conventional tillage (in herbaceous crops: 18% higher). Methods: No tillage included herbicide use. The Web of Knowledge database was searched, using the keywords, “Mediterranean”, “soil”, and “conventional”, and 33 data sets from 21 studies of no tillage were found and meta-analysed. The most recent studies included in this meta-analysis were published in 2011.

 

Soil: Use reduced tillage in arable fields Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated meta-analysis from 2013 of multiple Mediterranean countries found a higher percentage of organic matter in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage. Organic matter: A higher percentage of organic carbon was found in soils with reduced tillage, compared to conventional tillage (15% higher). Methods: The Web of Knowledge database was searched, using the keywords, “Mediterranean”, “soil”, and “conventional”, and 17 data sets from 12 studies of reduced tillage were found and meta-analysed. The most recent studies included in this meta-analysis were published in 2011.