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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Cutting trees in a secondary forest to increase gaur Bos gaurus numbers in Khao Phaeng Ma Reforestation area, Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand

Published source details

Prayong N. & Srikosamatara S. (2017) Cutting trees in a secondary forest to increase gaur Bos gaurus numbers in Khao Phaeng Ma Reforestation area, Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand. Conservation Evidence, 14, 5-9


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Remove vegetation by hand/machine Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A site comparison study in 2010–2012 in two secondary forest plots in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand (Prayong & Srikosamatara 2017) found that clearing vegetation using chainsaws increased the density of gaur Bos gaurus using these areas. Average gaur density was higher in a plot where pioneer trees were felled (8.6 individuals/km2/day) than in a plot where the vegetation was left unmanaged (4.0 individuals/km2/day). The study was conducted within an 8-km2 area, reforested since 1994. In May–September 2010, a total of 407 pioneer Macaranga siamensis trees were felled with chainsaws to open up 28% of a 5.7-ha plot. Trees were not felled in a nearby 4.7-ha plot. The ground within the felled and unfelled plots was cleared, using a tractor, in June and December 2011. Gaur dung piles were counted monthly, between February 2011 and March 2012, with the exception of June and December 2011. Dung piles were counted by 9–10 volunteers along 50-m-long transects (number not stated) with counts used to estimate guar usage of plots.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)